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Thread: Ponies Eligible for M&M Classes

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    Default Ponies Eligible for M&M Classes

    Ponies Eligible for M&M Classes


    (Any changes or addition needed, please PM me! Alot of information to digest and sort so may have made mistakes)


    Shetland
    Small ponies have existed in the Shetland Isles for over 2000 years and probably much longer. Various excavations on the islands have revealed the bones of small ponies that existed during the Bronze Age and it is thought that ponies have been in domestic use there since this time.
    Due to its island existence the pony has evolved with relatively few importations and those that did arrive were by necessity small owing to the difficulties of transportation by sea. Two significant types established themselves within the breed, the heavier boned animal with a longer head and the lighter one with high tail carriage and small pretty head, and these have remained distinct characteristics, which has stood the pony in very good stead for its changing roles in the service of mankind. Today the Shetland pony no longer has the hardworking life of its ancestors, as nowadays the main employment is for a child’s riding pony or for carriage driving, and it is hugely popular world-wide.
    The two types established within the breed from the ponies origins and which retain distinct characteristics today make it highly suitable for either function, the heavier boned draught animal with powerful chest and shoulders for driving and the lighter free moving pony with high tail carriage and pretty head for riding.

    Height - Registered stock must not exceed 40 inches (102cms) at three years or under, nor 42 inches (107cms) at four years or over.
    Colour - Shetland ponies may be any colour known in horses except spotted.
    Hair - A double coat in winter with guard hairs which shed the rain and keep the pony's skin completely dry in the worst of the weather and, in summer a short coat which should carry a beautiful silky sheen. At all times the mane and tail hair should be long, straight and profuse.
    Head - The head should be small, and in proportion. Ears should be small and erect, wide set but pointing well forward. Forehead should be broad with bold, dark, intelligent eyes. Muzzle must be broad with nostrils wide and open. Teeth and jaw must be correct.
    Conformation - The neck should be properly set onto the shoulder, which in turn should be sloping, not upright, and end in a well defined wither. The body should be strong, with plenty of heart room, well sprung ribs, the loin strong and muscular. The quarters should be broad and long with the tail set well up on them.
    Limbs - These should have good, flat bone. Strong forearm. Short balanced cannon bone. Springy pasterns. The thighs should be strong and muscular with well-shaped strong hocks. When viewed from behind, the hind legs should not be set too widely apart, nor should the hocks be turned in. Hooves should be tough, round and well shaped.
    Action - Straight, free action using every joint. Tracking up well.

    Breed Society: www.shetlandponystudbooksociety.co.uk


    (Pony: Bear. Credit: Lorilingo @ Hamlets House Native Pony Forum)



    Exmoor
    There has been very little crossbreeding with other horses or ponies, making the Exmoor the purest of the native pony breeds.
    Exmoor was once a Royal Forest and hunting ground, and was sold off in 1818. Sir Richard Acland, the last warden of Exmoor, took thirty ponies and established the famous Anchor herd, which still exists to this day. Local farmers also bought ponies at the dispersal sale, keeping the bloodlines pure.
    Some farmers tried crossing the pony with other breeds, but the offspring were not hardy enough to survive the harsh moor, and these herds died out early this century.
    The Exmoor Pony Society was formed in 1921, aiming to preserve the purebred Exmoor.
    The Second World War was disastrous for the ponies. The moor became a training ground, and the breed was nearly killed off, with only 50 ponies surviving the war. However, local people were able to rescue and re-establish herds. Exmoor numbers remained low until the early 1980s, when a publicity campaign drew outside attention to the rarity of the breed.
    The Exmoor is bred throughout Britain, and although the worldwide population is close to 2,000, the effective breeding population is less than 250, making Exmoor’s a rare breed. Some ponies still roam on the moor, and are privately owned. Every October, they are rounded up and the foals are inspected and registered with the Exmoor Pony Society. Every purebred is branded with a four-point star on the near shoulder, although this practice has attracted criticism. Colts considered below standard are gelded.

    Breed Standard:
    Height - The preferred Height Range is: Stallions & geldings 11.3hh (119.4cm) to 12.3hh (129.5cm) at maturity. Mares 11.2hh (116.8cm) to 12.2hh (127cm) at maturity.
    Colour - Bay, brown or dun, with black points; mealy colour on muzzle, round eyes & inside flanks; no white markings anywhere.
    Head - Short, thick & pointed; clean cut face; wide Neck: forehead, eyes large, wide apart & prominent with well-defined,
    fleshy hood and pale colouration outlining the eyes (Toad Eyes); wide nostrils; mealy muzzle; clean throat; good length of rein.
    Conformation – Shoulders clean, fine at top, well laid back. Chest is deep & wide between & behind forelegs; ribs long, deep, well sprung and wide apart. Back is level; broad & level across loins; tail neatly set in.
    Limbs - Clean & short legs, with neat, hard feet; forelegs straight, well apart & squarely set; hind legs well apart, nearly perpendicular from hock to fetlock with point of hock in line with pelvis bone; wide curve from flank to hock joint; legs.
    Action - Straight & smooth, free in motion with no tendency to sweep or turn and without exaggerated action.
    Hair - Summer - close, hard & bright. Winter - a double-layered dense coat with an under insulating layer of fine, springy hair and an outer water-proofing layer of hard, greasy hair.

    Breed Society: http://www.exmoorponysociety.org.uk/


    (Pony: Dunkery Firecrest. Rider/Owner: Ali Farrell)



    Dartmoor
    The native pony breed of the county of Devon in the South West of England. The ponies have been recorded living on the wild and inhospitable moors of Dartmoor since the Middle Ages. The ponies have the metabolism to prosper in the tough and uncompromising conditions they have to contend with. The ponies have an exceptional temperament and breeders have long realized their potential as children's ponies with the ability to make wonderful companions, give endless fun, and if required compete and succeed in all spheres of competition.

    Breed Standard:
    Height - Not Exceeding 127 cm. (12.2hh.)
    Colour - Bay, brown, black, grey, chestnut, roan. Coloured and spotty are not allowed. Excessive white markings should be discouraged
    Neck & Head - The head should be small with large kindly eyes and small alert ears. It should be well set on a good neck of medium length. The throat and jaws should be fine and showing no signs of coarseness or throatiness. Stallions to have a moderate crest.
    Conformation - Good shoulders are most important. They should be well laid back and sloping, but not too fine at the withers. Body should be of medium length and strong, well ribbed up with a good depth of girth giving plenty of heart room. The loins and hindquarters should be strong and well covered with muscle. The hind quarters should be of medium length and neither level nor steeply sloping. The tail is well set up.
    Limbs - The hocks should be well let down with plenty of length from hip to hock, clean cut and with plenty of bone below the hock. They should have a strong second thigh. They should not be 'sickled' or 'cow-hocked'. The forelegs should not be tied in at the knee. The fore-arm should be muscular and relatively long and the knee fairly large and flat at the front. The cannons should be short with ample good, flat, flinty bone. The pasterns should be sloping but not too long. The feet should be hard and well shaped.
    Action - Low and straight coming from the shoulder with good hock action but without exaggeration.
    Hair - The mane and tail should be full and flowing.

    Breed Society: www.dartmoorponysociety.com


    (Pony: Greenferns Ben Lomond. Handler/Owner: Gemma Wyman)



    Welsh Section A
    The Section A is also known as the Welsh mountain pony. Welsh ponies are known for their good temperament, hardiness, and free-moving gaits.
    In 1901, the first registry for the ponies was established in the United Kingdom, and in 1907 another registry was established in the United States. Interest in the breed declined during the Great Depression, but revived in the 1950s.Throughout its history, the Welsh Pony has had many uses, including as a cavalry horse, a pit pony, and as a working animal on farms.
    Today, the modern Welsh Pony is used for many equestrian disciplines, both for pleasure riding and in competition, as a in hand, riding and/or driving pony. It is a popular children's pony. The Welsh also crosses well with many other breeds and has influenced the development of many British and American horse and pony breeds.

    Breed Standard:
    Height - Not exceeding 12.2hh (17cms)
    Colour - Any colour, except coloured & spotted.
    Head - Small, clean-cut, well set on and tapering to the muzzle. Bold eyes. Ears well-placed, small and pointed, well up on the head, proportionately close. Nostrils prominent and open. Jaw and throat clean and finely cut, with ample room at the angle of the jaw.
    Conformation – Neck should be lengthy, well carried and moderately lean in the case of mares, but inclined to be cresty in the case of mature stallions. Shoulders should be long and sloping well back. Withers moderately fine, but not "knifey". The humerus upright so that the foreleg is not set in under the body. Back and loin should be muscular, strong and well coupled. Deep girth and well sprung ribs. Hind quarters should be lengthy and fine. Not cobby, ragged or goose-rumped. Tail well set on and carried gaily.
    Limbs – Forelegs set square and true, and not tied in at the elbows. Long, strong forearm, well developed knee, short flat bone below knee, pasterns of proportionate slope and length, feet well-shaped and round, hoofs dense. Hocks to be large, flat and clean with points prominent, to turn neither inward nor outward. The hind leg not to be too bent. The hock not to be set behind a line from the point of the quarter to the fetlock joint. Pasterns of proportionate slope and length. Feet well shaped, hoofs dense.
    Action - Quick, free and straight from the shoulder, well away in front. Hocks well flexed with straight and powerful leverage and well under the body.

    Breed Society:www.wpcs.uk.com


    (Pony: Pontllys Erie Warrior. Rider: Ashleigh Sumner. Credit: Equinational)


    Welsh Section B
    The Welsh Section B has been selectively bred from the Welsh Mountain Pony, and is generally taller and lighter in build. The emphasis being placed on riding pony qualities combined with traditional welsh pony characteristics and substance. First bred to meet the demand of a larger riding type for Welsh hill farmers; who needed a means of transport for shepherding across the hills, cattle herding, and rounding up wild mountain ponies.
    They are known for elegant movement and athletic ability while still retaining the substance and hardiness of the foundation stock, the Section A Welsh pony. They have no lower height limit.
    Section B ponies generally have a slightly lighter build, as a result of Thoroughbred and Hackney blood. Section B ponies resemble the Section A pony, but are of a more refined "riding type". However, they should not be light of bone; they should resemble their Mountain Pony ancestors for quality of bone. In addition to the desirable characteristics of the Type A pony, Type B ponies have a free-flowing movement.

    Breed Standard: (much the same as Sec A)
    Height – Max 13.2hh (137 cm)
    Colour - Any colour except coloured or spotted.
    Conformation - Body should be deep, with ribs well sprung. Loins should be muscular, strong and well coupled. Shoulders should be long and sloping, with moderately fine wither. Neck should be well set and moderate in length. Head should be small and neat, tapering to the muzzle. They should have a muscular neck, arching from withers to poll, and have a deep, wide chest.
    Limbs - Legs should be strong, set square, and short in the cannons, with plenty of dense flat bone. Hooves should be rounded and dense.
    Action - Straight and free from the shoulder. Knees and hocks should be well flexed with straight.

    Breed Society: www.wpcs.uk.com


    (Pony: Wian Ultimate. Handler/Owner: Sophie Scott)



    Welsh Section C
    They are known for their strength, hardiness and gentle nature. Unlike the Welsh Section B, it is heavier and more cob-like and compact.
    The Welsh Pony of Cob Type first resulted from a crossbreeding between the Welsh Section A and the Welsh Section D. Today, some Section C ponies are still produced from this cross. In the past the WPCS also accepted Section C ponies with Section B blood but that is no longer the case. There were also crosses with Iberian horses, which led to the development of the Powys horse, which was also a foundation for this type.

    Breed Standard:
    Height - Not exceeding 13 hands 2 inches (137.2 cms)
    Colour - Any colour except coloured and spotted.
    Head - Full of quality and pony character. A coarse head and Roman nose are most objectionable. Jaws and throat to be Clean and finely-cut, with ample room at the angle of jaw.
    Conformation – Neck should be lengthy, well carried and moderately lean in the case of mares, but inclined to be cresty in the case of mature stallions. Shoulders should be strong but well laid back. Body should be muscular, strong and well coupled back and loins. Deep girth with well sprung ribs. Hindquarters should be lengthy and strong. Ragged or drooping quarters are objectionable. Tail well set on.
    Limbs - Set square and true and not tied in at the elbows. Long strong forearm. Well developed knees with an abundance of bone below them. Pasterns of proportionate slope and length. Feet well shaped and round. Hooves dense. When in the rough a moderate quantity of silky feather is not objected to, but coarse, wiry hair is a definite objection. Second thighs should be strong and muscular. Hocks to be large, flat and clean with points prominent, to turn neither inwards nor outwards. The hind leg not be too bent. The hock not to be set behind a line from the point of the quarter to the fetlock joint. Pasterns of proportionate slope and length. Feet well shaped and hooves dense
    Action - Free, true and forcible. The knee should be bent and the whole foreleg should be extended straight from the shoulder and as far forward as possible in the trot. Hocks flexed under the body with straight and powerful leverage.
    Breed Society: www.wpcs.uk.com


    (Pony: Popsters Loaded Weapon. Rider/Owner: Chloe Chubb)


    Welsh Section D
    The Welsh Section D is the largest size within the Welsh Pony and Cob breed registries. Though they are the tallest and stockiest of the Welsh sections, the head remains full of pony character, with large eyes, and neat ears. Like the section C, they have powerful, extravagant action. Grey coloring is rarer in the section D cob than other types of Welsh ponies.
    They became well established as a breed by the fifteenth century and was used mainly for farm work and as a means of transport, both ridden and in harness. Welsh Cobs were also used by the army for pulling guns and equipment and were ridden by the infantry. Stallion licensing was introduced in 1918 and the best stock was identified by competing in trotting contests.

    Breed standard:
    Height - The height should exceed 13.2 hh (137cms): no upper limit
    Colour - Any colour except coloured or spotted.
    Head - Full of quality and pony character - A coarse head and Roman nose are most objectionable. Jaws and throat should be clean and finely-cut, with ample room at the angle of jaw.
    Conformation – Neck should be lengthy, well carried and moderately lean in the case of mares, but inclined to be cresty in the case of mature stallions. Shoulders should be strong but well laid back. Body should be muscular, strong and well coupled back and loins. Deep girth with well sprung ribs. Hindquarters should be lengthy and strong. Ragged or drooping quarters are objectionable. Tail well set on.
    Limbs – Forelegs set square and true and not tied in at the elbows. Long strong forearm. Well developed knees with an abundance of bone below them. Pasterns of proportionate slope and length. Feet well shaped and round. Hooves dense. When in the rough a moderate quantity of silky feather is not objected to, but coarse, wiry hair is a definite objection. Second thighs should be strong and muscular. Hocks to be large, flat and clean with points prominent, to turn neither inwards nor outwards. The hind leg not be too bent. The hock not to be set behind a line from the point of the quarter to the fetlock joint. Pasterns of proportionate slope and length. Feet well shaped and hooves dense.
    Action - Free, true and forcible. The knee should be bent and the whole foreleg should be extended straight from the shoulder and as far forward as possible in the trot. Hocks flexed under the body with straight and powerful leverage.
    Breed Society: www.wpcs.uk.com


    (Pony: Pentrepiod The Judge. Rider: Aimie Hoare)

    New Forest
    The New Forest Pony is a recognized British Isles breed but has an unusual background for a native pony breed. The earliest record of horses in the New Forest dates back to 1016 when rights of common pasture were granted to the people living in what was a royal hunting ground. Since then, either as specific attempts to improve the breed or just as part of the normal life and trade in the New Forest, many outside breeds were introduced. Notable blood lines were Welsh, Thoroughbred, Arab and Hackney. Later, another concerted effort was made to improve the New Forest blood and other British Isles pony blood-lines were introduced to achieve this, including Fell Ponies, Dales, Highlands, Dartmoor and Exmoor.

    Breed Standard:
    Height - The upper height limit is 14.2hh (148cms). There is no lower limit.
    Colour - Any colourexceptpiebald, skewbald, spotted or blue eyed cream. Palomino or very light chestnut and cream ponies with dark eyes are not eligible as licensed stallions. Blue eyes are not permitted. White markings other than on the head and lower limbs: loss of, or absence of, pigment in hair or skin that is not known to have been associated solely with skin trauma is not acceptable. So, for the purposes of entry into the approved section of the Stud Book a pony shall not have any white markings behind the head, above a horizontal line level with the bony protuberance of the accessory carpal bone at the back of the knee in the forelimb, and the point of the hock in the hind limb, unless proven to be due to trauma/injury.
    Head - Neat and pony like, well set on.
    Conformation - They should have sloping shoulders and strong quarters, plenty of flat bone, good depth of body. Neck should be strong and of ample length.
    Limbs - Straight limbs with plenty of bone and hard round feet
    Action - This should be free, active and straight, but not exaggerated.
    Note - Ponies registered in the X Section of the Stud Book may not adhere to the Breed Standard. These ponies are not pemitted in Registered New Forest Pony classes.

    Breed Society: www.newforestpony.com


    (Pony: Backley Touch of Gold. Owner: Sara Jeapes)



    Connemara
    The Connemara region in County Galway in western Ireland, where the breed first became recognized as a distinct type, is a very harsh landscape, thus giving rise to a pony breed of hardy, strong individuals. Some believe that the Connemara developed from Scandinavian ponies that the Vikings first brought to Ireland. Another source was likely the Irish Hobby, a now-extinct breed established prior to the 13th century.
    For additional strength and stamina, Arabian blood was added in the 1700s. They were also crossed with Hackneys and Thoroughbreds. Too much crossbreeding began to dilute the pony bloodlines, so the Connemara Pony Breeders’ Society, founded in 1923, worked to preserve the breed type. The stud book was established in 1926. Today, Connemara’s are bred worldwide in Ireland and the United Kingdom, as well as on the European Continent, the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa.


    Breed Standard:
    Height - Normally 12.2hh (128cms) to 14.2hh (148cms) at maturity.
    Colour & Markings - Grey, black, bay, brown, dun with occasional roan, chestnut & palomino and cream
    Head - Well balanced pony head of medium length with good width between large kindly eyes, pony ears, well defined cheekbone - Jaw relatively deep but not coarse.
    Conformation - Head well set on to neck. Chest should not be over-developed. Neck not set on too low. Good length of rein. Well defined withers, good sloping shoulder. Body should be deep, with strong back, some length permissible but should be well ribbed up an with strong loins. Strong and muscular hindquarters with some length, well developed second thighs and strong low set hocks.
    Limbs - Good length and strength in the forearm, well defined knees and short cannons, with flat bone measuring 18 - 21cms. Elbow should be free. Pasterns of medium length, feet well shaped, of medium size, hard and level
    Action - Free, easy and true, without undue knee action, but covering the ground
    Breed Society: www.britishconnemaras.co.uk or www.cpbs.ie


    (Pony: Walstead Willow Warbler. Owner/Handler: Joy Wyman)


    Highland
    The ancestors of the Highland pony may have lived in Scotland before the Ice Age. The breed was influenced by the horses from invading armies, and by various out crossings. In the past, there were two types: the small and light pony of the Western Isles, and the larger and heavier mainland-bred Garron. Both types have integrated now, and there is generally less distinction, but the smaller type survives as the extremely rare Eriskay pony.
    In the 16th century, French and Spanish horses, including the Percheron, were taken to the Scottish highlands. In the 19th century, a Hackney type and the Fell Pony and Dales Pony were added.
    The breed was originally bred to work on the small farms of Scotland, hauling timber and game as well as ploughing. They are still used for such work, but are usually enjoyed as all-round ponies, good for jumping and trekking, due to their quietness, stamina, and ability to carry weight.
    There are an estimated 5,500 Highlands in the world today, with most in Europe. Although some are still bred for their substance and stamina, the trend is to breed for a pony more suited for riding and driving. Despite increasing popularity, the breed is still categorised as Category 4, "At Risk" by the Rare Breeds Survival Trust.

    Breed standard:
    Height - 13hh to 14.2hh (132-148cms)
    Head - Well-carried and alert with a kindly eye. Broad-muzzled with a deep jowl.
    Colours - A range of duns - mouse, yellow, grey, cream. Also grey, brown, black and bay and occasionally liver chestnut with silver mane and tail. Many ponies have a dorsal stripe and some show zebra markings on legs. Shoulder stripe often present. A small star is acceptable but other white markings are discouraged. Foal coat often changes and many ponies change colour gradually as they grow older, especially those with grey hairs interspersed with the original colour. Others show a slight seasonal change in colour between winter and summer coats. Broken colours are not allowed. NB: Stallions with white markings other than a small star are not eligible for licensing.
    Conformation - Reasonable length of neck going from wither with a good sloping shoulder and well-placed forearm. Well-balanced and compact with deep chest and plenty of room for heart and lungs. Ribs well sprung. Powerful quarters with well developed thigh, strong second thigh.
    Limbs: Flat hard bone, broad knees, short cannon bones, oblique pasterns and well-shaped broad dark hoofs. Clean flat hocks.
    Hair - Hair should be natural, flowing and untrimmed with a full tail. Feather hair at back of legs soft and silky

    Breed Society: www.highlandponysociety.com


    (Pony: Dunedin Monarch. Rider: Bryher Gall. Owner: Angela Douglas. Credit: James Pyne Photography)


    Dales
    The Dales Pony developed from the native Pennine Pony and was greatly influenced by the now-extinct Scottish Galloway, which improved their speed and sure-footedness. The ponies were originally bred as pack animals to carry heavy loads of lead through the countryside from Northumberland and County Durham to furnaces.
    With their agility, power and speed, the Dales had great success in the trotting races of the 18th century and the organized hunts. Because they could survive so well in a harsh climate, the British Army used them as pack and artillery ponies.
    In the 18th and 19th centuries, Clydesdale, Norfolk Trotter, and Yorkshire Roadster blood was added to improve the trotting ability of the Dales.
    The Fell Pony continued to intermingle with the Dales into the early 20th century. In 1912, Dalesman was chosen as a Fell premium stallion by the Board of Agriculture. In 1924, he was re-registered as a Dales Pony.
    The Dales Pony Improvement Society was formed at Hexham in 1916 to protect the ponies’ future. One of its aims was to discourage crossbreeding with Clydesdales. Because so many ponies were used in the war, the breed was nearly wiped out, and numbers did not begin to increase until 1963, when the Dales Pony Society was formed. There are two sections of Dales Pony currently allowed in the main stud book - section A, ponies possessing minimal white markings, and section B, ponies possessing more white than allowed in the main registry of A.

    Breed Standard:
    Height – 14hh (143cms) to 14.2hh (148cms)
    Colour & Markings - Black, Brown, a few grey and bay and occasionally roan. A white star and/or snip on the head. White fetlocks on the hind legs only. Mis-marked ponies will be downgraded to the grading-up register.
    Head - Neat and pony like, showing no dish. Broad between the eyes, which should be bright and alert. Pony ears slightly incurving. Long foretop of straight hair down the face.
    Conformation - Strong and of ample length. Stallions should display a bold outlook with a well-arched crest. Throat and jaws clean cut. Shoulders should be well laid, long, sloping shoulders with well-developed muscles. Withers not too fine. Body should be short coupled and deep through the chest, with well sprung ribs. Hindquarters deep, lengthy and powerful. Second thighs well developed and very muscular. Tail well set on, not high, with plenty of long straight hair reaching the ground.
    Limbs – hind legs should be broad, flat and clean. Well let down with plenty of dense flat bone below. Forelegs should be set square. Short and very muscular with broad, well developed knees.The very best of feet and legs with flexible joints, showing quality with no coarseness. The cannons should display 8" - 9" of flat flinty bone and well defined tendons. Pasterns should be nicely sloping and of good length. Large, round feet, open at the heels with well developed frogs
    Hair - Long flowing mane and tail. Ample silky feather on the heels.
    Action - Clean, high, straight and true. Going forward on "all fours" with tremendous energy. The knee and hock are lifted, the hind legs flexed well under the body for powerful drive.

    Breed Society: www.dalespony.org


    (Pony: Lowhouses Black Magic. Owner: Nipna Stud)


    Fell
    The Fell Pony shares its origins with the now-extinct Galloway pony which was also the root of the Dales Pony. It is believed to have originated on the border between England and Scotland during Roman times from the crossing of imported war stallions with the local Celtic ponies. They were originally brown in colour, though over the last few decades black has become predominant, followed by brown, bay and grey.
    They are primarily a working breed of pony with activity, stamina, hardiness and intelligence that enables them to live and thrive in tough conditions out on the fells in the Lake District.

    Breed Standard:
    Height - Not exceeding 14hh (143cms)
    Colour & Markings - Black, brown, bay or grey preferably with no white markings, although a star or a little white on the hind feet is allowed.
    Head - Head should be small, well chiselled in outline, well set on, forehead broad and tapering to nose. Nostrils are large and expanding. Eyes should be prominent, bright mild and intelligent. Ears neatly set, well formed and small. Fine through the throat and jaws showing no signs of throatiness or coarseness.
    Conformation – Neck should be of proportionate length, giving good length of rein, strong and not too heavy, moderate crest in case of stallion. Shoulders are ost important, well laid back and sloping, not too fine at withers and not leaded at the points - a good long shoulder blade with well developed muscles. Good strong back and good outline, muscular loins, deep carcass, thick through heart, round ribbed from shoulders to flank, short and well coupled, hind quarters strong with tail well set on. Good thighs and second thighs.
    Limbs - Feet of good size, round and well formed, open at heels with the characteristic blue horn, fair sloping pasterns not too long. Forelegs should be straight, well placed and not tied at the elbows. Big well formed knees, short cannon bone, plenty of good flat bone below knee (8" at least) with great muscularity of arm. Very muscular hocks, well let down and clean cut. Plenty of bone below the joint. Hocks should not be sickle of cow-hocked
    Mane Tail & Feathers - Plenty of fine hair (coarse hair objectionable) all the fine hair except that at the point of heel may be cast in summer. Mane and tail are left to grow long.
    Action - Walk - smart and true. Trot - well balanced all round with good knee and hock action, going well from the shoulder flexing the hocks. Not going too wide nor near behind. Should show great pace and endurance, bringing the hind legs well under the body when going
    Breed Society: www.fellponysociety.org

    (Pony: Castle Hill Raven. Handler/Owner: Hayley Reynolds)

    British Natives Not eligible for M&M


    British Spotted Pony (NOT included in the M&M section)
    The British Spotted Pony was at one time feral in the British Isles and his spotted coat pattern was his natural camouflage as he roamed the heaths and forests of ancient Britain. Stone Age man painted pictures of him on his cave walls and he also appeared in many illustrated manuscripts and drawings down through the ages.
    During Roman times, some of the mounts of the more important Officers were spotted horses of great elegance and from old paintings and documents, we have learned that many of the fine horses sent as gifts between the Royal Families of Europe were spotted.
    After the last War, there was a great awakening of interest in spotted equines many of which were exported to Australia, America, Canada and Europe, so in 1947 a Society called the British Spotted Horse and Pony Society was formed to keep a register of them. With so many having left our shores during the 1960's and 1970's the British Spotted Pony became relatively rare and so in 1976, the Society split with the ponies of 14.2hh and under being looked after by the British spotted Pony Society, while the bigger ones went under the wing of the British appaloosa Society.
    All ponies must display some or all of the following:
    White sclera around the eye.
    Mottled skin - this part-dark, part-pink skin is usually most evident around the genitals, lips, muzzle, eyes and inside the ears.
    Striped hooves.
    Breed Standard:
    Colours -
    Leopard: Spots of any colour on a white or lightly coloured background.
    Near Leopard is very similar but the pony will usually have a darker head, neck and legs with the remainder of its body being similar to that of the Leopard.
    Few Spot Leopard: White base colour with only a few spots. Strong characteristics often accompanied by varnish marks (groupings of dark hairs within an area - usually nose, check bones, stifle, gaskin and knee).
    Snowflake: white spots on a dark base coat.
    Blanket: An area of white over the hips and hindquarters with or without spots. Any base colour. The blanket can extend over the entire back and shoulders. The latter must display strong breed characteristics.
    Mottled pattern: The coat is most often irregularly ticked with white, having also large or small roan spots, their outlines rather blurred. Sometimes also a coat looking like an ordinary roan but in which dark blots (varnish marks) appear.
    Solid Colour: is a pony bred from spotted parents but which does not display the spotted coat pattern. Interestingly, some ponies born solid colour can and very often do develop spots as they get older.
    Piebald and skewbald markings of any kind are not eligible. Breeding to greys is discouraged as this dilutes the colour and can introduce the greying (fading) gene. Solid colours are eligible for a separate register but must be of proven spotted breeding and preferably show some breed characteristics.
    Head - Full of quality and true pony character. Big bold eyes, set well apart. Ears should be well placed, small, neat and in proportion to the head. Prominent pen nostrils. Clean well defined throat. A coarse head and roman nose is discouraged.
    Conformation – Neck should have good length and be well carried. Moderately lean in mares but inclined to be more cresty in stallions. Slightly heavier neck is allowable in the cob type. Shoulders should be good strong, sloping and well laid back. Withers should be well defined but not 'knifey'. Hindquarters should be lengthy, strong, well muscled, not ragged or dropping with well set on tail.
    Limbs – Forelegs should be square and true. Not tied-in at the elbow. Long strong forearms with well developed knee. Short flat bone below the knee. Pasterns of proportionate length and slope. Well shaped dense hooves. The cob type should have a greater abundance of bone without coarseness and a moderate quantity of fine feather when in the rough. Hindlegs should have well let down hocks, large flat clean bone, prominent points. The hock not to be set behind a line from the point of quarter to fetlock joint. No sickle or cow hocks. Pasterns to be of proportionate length and slope. Hooves well shaped and dense
    Action - Low, straight, from the shoulder. Free flowing. Hocks well flexed with straight action coming well under the body. The cob type may show more knee action.

    Breed Society: www.britishspottedponysociety.co.uk


    (Pony: Patch. Owner: Mrs B Willis. Credit: British spotted Pony Society)



    Eriskay (NOT included in the M&M section)
    The Eriskay Pony developed in the Hebrides, a group of western isles in Scotland. The origins of the breed are ancient, with roots in Celtic and Norse breeding. It is related to other northern breeds, including the Icelandic horse. Originally, the breed had a fairly large population, and until the mid-19th century the Eriskay and similar ponies were found throughout the western islands of Scotland.
    During the 1800s numbers were much reduced through increased crossbreeding. The crossbreeding was used to produce larger ponies for draught work, and Eriskay’s and other island ponies were crossed with horse breeds from mainland Europe, including Arabs and Clydesdales. A few specimens of the Eriskay were preserved on the remotest islands of Scotland, mainly due to the difficulties of accessing the islands. This stock of ponies remained pure, but through the advent of mechanisation, declined in population to around 20 animals in the early 1970s.
    Today the Eriskay is rare. Its population is considered to be at critical status by the UK-based Rare Breeds Survival Trust, meaning that there are 300 or fewer breeding females registered in the world today. In 2006, there were believed to have been around 300 mares and 4 purebred stallions, and by 2009 this number had risen to around 420 ponies worldwide. It is possible that the Eriskay is the last surviving Hebrides pony breed. There are two breed registries that represent the breed. The first (the Eriskay Pony Mother Society or Comann Each nan Eilean, formed in 1972) has the goal of maintaining the purity of the Eriskay breed, and disallows all crossbreeding. The second (the Eriskay Pony Society, formed in 1995) aims to produce ponies with desirable traits, which the registry feels will help promote their survival – this registry has considered the possibility of cross-breeding.

    Breed Standard:
    Height – 12hh -13.2hh
    Colour - The dominant colour pattern is that foals are born black and turn grey as they age. Some do not turn grey and other colours occur. In dark coloured animals there should be a light coloured muzzle and a light coloured ring round the eye; there should not be a pronounced eel stripe.
    Head - Large, wide and deep. There should be good bold eyes set well apart. Wide forehead with well set ears in proportion. There should be a deep jaw and tapering muzzle.
    Conformation – Body should be Generous in all dimensions, relative to the height of the legs. There should be a long rib cage and very short loin ensure strength to the back. Croup to buttocks gently sloping to tail. Very large, deep, well sprung chest, ideally having a gentle but pronounced slope from the spine downwards towards the full width of the ribcage. Neck should be strong and well muscled whilst set in high and carried proudly, showing a good length of rein. Well muscled and strong shoulders. Low set tail.
    Limbs – Relatively short and sloping pasterns. Hooves should be small and neat with hard horn, somewhat upright with rather flat soles.
    Hair - Forelock, mane and tail well developed and generous in quantity, not coarse and heavy. Fine silky coat in summer. Dense but not unduly heavy coat in winter.
    Action - Legs are not lifted high and steps are short. Smooth and free without exaggeration. Good rhythm and cadence. Walk and trot straight and true with good flexion of the hocks and freedom of the shoulders.

    Breed Society: www.eriskaypony.com


    (Credit: www.horseshowcentral.com)


    All Breed standards are taken from the relevant breed society. Links to those are found after each breed standard of each breed. History was taken from a mix of breed societys and Wikipedia.
    Last edited by Peaches; 21-06-2010 at 11:08.
    Native pony addict!

  2. #2
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    Great idea having all the breed standards together but I think you need to reference them when its word for word, or at least credit the site you took them from

    sorry - i recognised the fell pony society one I'm sad, I know but a friend got chucked outta uni for plagiarism, so Im paranoid about it!
    Size 34" Shires Huntingdon Green Tweed Show Jacket for sale as too big. Only worn twice, immaculate condition. Cost 89.99, make me an offer

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    They are all credited to their breed society (i put URLs in each post) Is that not enough? i'll put a disclaimer explaining at the bottom Thanks for pointing it out!

    Now in red at the bottom
    Native pony addict!

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    I am dim and cant beleive I didnt notice you put the websites on, I blame it being friday afternoon

    Size 34" Shires Huntingdon Green Tweed Show Jacket for sale as too big. Only worn twice, immaculate condition. Cost 89.99, make me an offer

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    Why have you got the connemara down as a British Native Pony?

    The description from wikipedia is flawed and has even misquoted the grading standards from the CPBS ... palomino and cream are not accepted colours.

    Not your fault, the wikipedia article is just useless

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rips View Post
    Why have you got the connemara down as a British Native Pony?

    The description from wikipedia is flawed and has even misquoted the grading standards from the CPBS ... palomino and cream are not accepted colours.

    Not your fault, the wikipedia article is just useless
    CPBS breed standards do accept palomino and dark eyed cream generally...I think? Not sure if there is any division as to their gradings based on colour though?
    .

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    that Shetland has no bone at all!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wally View Post
    that Shetland has no bone at all!



    Mother always told me honesty is the best policy, but for most the truth hurts.

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    meeeeh,the connies are in the wrong thread

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    No they don't. Blue eyed creams and palomino's aren't eligible for Class 1 registration. They fail on the 'visual inspection'.
    'Buckskin' ponies somewhat controversially are, as they were mistakenly identified as 'dun' when the studbook was created. They accept that as a result cream ponies exist within the breed, but they have not been been encouraged for the last 100 years, and there is still a huge amount of prejudice against the colour. No more then say, the 'red' or marked fresians.
    A dark eyed cream is just another name for a sooty palomino, which are few and far between, and would have to be very dark and exceptinally made to pass the gradings because of the prejudice that exists.
    Yes, its 'silly' - but theres a reason the majority of the registered stallions of quality are grey, they were bred from a very small genepool, no cream pony was ever considered 'correct' and as a result they were never bred. The grey and dun connemara produced plenty of successful lines and still do, with typical ponies having good bone, great jumping ability and a super temperament ... no reason to start changing it now. Its not broke, don't try and fix it!
    Perhaps if the level of inbreeding was rising they might reconsider - but its not. There are plenty of modern connnemara's, sucessful, true to type, with various bloodlines and little inbreeding.

    If differs obviously based on the country, the British society and the American society have different rules... but the connemara is an Irish pony and only the Irish ponies have remained true to type. I've seen British Connemara's I wouldn't even recognise as connemara's and as for cross-breeding with the hackney and thoroughbred not in a pink fit. There was no significant imput from either of those breeds, the foundation connemaras were selected due to type and bred to native Irish stock, and native stock alone. Some of the foundation mares have had some TB, but it certainly wasn't encouraged, they were trying to increase and promote bone, not decrease it.

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