Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Non-Bristish Native Ponies

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    11,585

    Default Non-Bristish Native Ponies

    Non-British Natives


    (If you have any more suggestions or I have made a mistake, please PM me & I’ll do them too! But these are some of the most common/well known foreign native horses & ponies)


    Haflinger (Austria)

    Haflingers were first imported into Great Britain in the 1960s. They were the native horses from the Alpine farms of Austria and have a long history on the Continent. In the South Tyrol, where the breed originated, stallions have been registered for nearly one hundred years, and organised breeding by a government department has been in operation for more than fifty years.
    The Haflinger breed was established by crossing the native Tyrolean pony with Arab blood brought back from the Continental Wars with the Turks - the result was a combination of native hardiness with spirit and elegance.
    The Duchess of Devonshire, our patron, was one of the first to see the possibilities of the breed. Her Majesty the Queen is also an owner of Haflingers after being presented with two mares during a state visit to Austria.
    The Haflinger Society of Great Britain, founded in 1970, modelled itself on the Austrian (Tyrolean) precepts regarding Haflinger breeding. The Society is still guided by Austria and linked through membership of the World Haflinger Federation, which unites most of the world’s Haflinger Societies, setting overall standards and breeding aims

    Breed Standard:
    Head - expressive, lean and noble with slight dish. Large, dark and lively eyes. Fine nostrils and ears, that are in proportion to the head. A stallion's head should be strong and masculine whereas that of the female should be lighter and more feminine. The connection to the neck should not be too thick.
    Neck - Reasonably long, light and well-positioned, set on sloping shoulders with good withers, suitable for a riding pony.. The neck should not be set too deeply on the body.
    Body - Broad and deep chest, well tensed, but not straight, back, broad loins with good joints, a croup that is not too short, too steep nor exhibiting pronounced moulding and a well carried tail. Reasonably deep girth which should measure 65"-73",[165 - 185.4 cms]
    Limbs - Clean and well positioned with hard, healthy hooves, strong forearms and a good second thigh, short cannons. Pasterns should be neither too short and steep nor too long and sloping.
    Paces - Stride should be long, free and elastic.
    Bone - Mares 6 1/2" - 7 3/4" (17-19.6cm) Stallions 7 1/4" - 8 1/2" (18.4 - 21.6cms)
    Height - At 3 years minimum heights: Mares 13.3hh+ (140cms) Stallions 13.3 hh+ (140cms)
    Colour - Chestnut, light, middle, liver or red. Dappling is acceptable as are paler legs and under body. White hairs within the coat (roaning), are not encouraged. Mane & tail should be white or flaxen. Coloured hairs are not encouraged but will not necessarily bar registration.
    Temperament - Friendly, uncomplicated and willing

    Haflinger GB Breed Society: The Haflinger Society of Great Britain www.haflingersgb.com


    (Credit: www.chezpilou.com)


    Fjord (Norway)

    Norway is of course the home of the Fjord Horse and the Mother Stud Book Country or Cradle of the Race as it is known in European Commission language. The Fjord is renowned for its extraordinary calm and even temper and consequently it can be handled by almost any member of the family, making it the ideal family horse of today. It is to be seen all over Europe and beyond at family shows competing and providing healthy fun for its young riders and giving them a sense of responsibility towards other creatures. Its unselfish nature provides an excellent learning base for youngsters. It seems to have the ability to carry on with its work whatever that may be without rancour. These qualities make it an ideal adult mount and it is widely used for trekking and long distance riding. The Fjord has definitely moved with the times because it is just as much appreciated today as a family mount and sport horse as it was as a work horse in the past.


    Height - There is no upper or lower limit, but the desired height at the withers is between 135cm and 150cm (13.1hh to 14.3hh).
    Colours and markings - The five accepted colours are brown dun, uls dun, grey (blue dun), red dun and yellow dun. It is important that the so-called primitive markings are appreciated and preserved. A star is only accepted on a mare. Other visible markings are not accepted.
    Hair - The forelock on mature horses covers from one half to two thirds of the head. Excessive feathering on the legs is not desirable. Tradition rules that the Fjord should have an upright mane. The horse ought be presented with a clipped mane in a convex shape to complement the neck’s top line.
    Head - It should be proportional, small and well defined, with a wide and flat forehead. The length from the eye to the muzzle should be short; the profile should be straight or preferably slightly dished (concave). The eyes should be large, dark and bright with a calm expression. The nostrils ought to be wide and in proportion so that the muzzle gives a "square" appearance. The lower jaws must not be so heavy as to make the head appear coarse. The ears should be relatively short, with a refined point at the tips and wide set. The ears should be parallel, with an outward curvature from the tip to the middle of the ear.
    Conformation - the Fjord should have good depth through the heart girth and width through the barrel and a proportional amount of muscling reflecting gender and age.
    Neck - ought to be set high and have a convex top line. Stallions especially often have a strong neck. It must be recognised that a long, thin neck is not desirable.
    Shoulder and withers - gently sloping shoulder angle, which allows forward extension of the forelimbs. The withers of the Fjord Horse are not typically prominent but blend smoothly into the back. The forehand should have the same length as the back and hindquarters
    Body and top line - The ribs should be well sprung, yet not round. The back and the loin area should be smooth and well muscled. The loins are extremely important and should be carefully assessed, as they are the bridge between the mid-section and the hindquarters. The transition between the loin and croup should be flexible and blend smoothly together. The length of the coupling/ loin should be short, yet strong and proportional to the back and the croup.
    Hindquarters - The croup should be long, broad, well muscled and sloping. Too sloping or too flat are not desirable. The tail should not be set on too high or too low and it should be carried freely and naturally.
    Limbs - The forearm should be broad and well muscled. The legs should be correctly aligned and with adequate bone. The joints and tendons must be clearly defined and dry. A short and firm cannon bone is desired. The cannon bones ought to be clean and dry, and should not be tied below the knee. The knee should be large, and well defined. The hock joint should be large, well developed and dry. The point of the hock must be prominent when viewed from the side. The fetlock joints should be strong and well defined. The pasterns should be strong, and sufficiently long and sloping to give adequate support and elasticity. The hooves of the Fjord Horse should be well balanced and proportionately round and large, with good horn quality, the inside of the hoof wall may be slightly steeper than the outside.
    Action - must reflect the conformation in sufficient elasticity and impulsion to perform an effortless walk, trot and canter. The movements should be energetic, with good balance and cadence. The Fjord Horse must move freely in all three gaits. The canter should be balanced, and free with supple and elastic forward movement. The trot shall be energetic, however excessive action is considered not typical for the breed.

    Breed Society: www.fjord-horse.co.uk or www.fjordhorseint.no


    (Credit: www.equestrianandhorse.com)


    Icelandic (Iceland)


    All of the horses found in Iceland today are the descendants of horses taken there by the Vikings. Space was precious on the longboats, so only the best horses were selected. The ancestors of today’s Icelandic horses came from Northern Scandinavia and the British Isles - in particular the Dole Horse of Norway and from Britain the Celtic Pony, the ancestor of the Exmoor and the Shetland.
    As well as the usual gaits - walk, trot and canter - Icelandic’s also have the four-beat running walk known as "TÖLT". This can be performed at any speed and is incredibly comfortable for the rider.
    Although small, they are always referred to as "horses" - there is no word in Icelandic for pony

    Breed Standard:
    Height - rarely more than 14.2hh, or less than 12hh, though heights are not fixed.
    Colour – they can be literally any colour - bay, brown, chestnut, grey, skewbald, palomino or dun, with hundreds of variations of the usual colours.
    Hair - the mane and tail are thick and plentiful. In the summer the coat is fine and shiny, but in winter the horse grows a long, thick coat with three distinct layers.
    Limbs - they have short-coupled legs with very high bone density.
    Conformation - rather stocky, with a deep chest, expressive head, supple, well-set neck and strong limbs. When ridden, he should give an impression of courage and power, with a proud expression. They bred to carry heavy adult riders.
    Action - As well as the usual gaits - walk, trot and canter - Icelandic’s also have the four-beat running walk known as "TÖLT". This can be performed at any speed and is incredibly comfortable for the rider. Tölt is a 4-beat lateral gait, where the footfalls are the same as in walk - left hind - left front - right hind - right front, in an even rhythm. Although this is a gait which can be performed at all speeds (from a fast walking speed through to canter speed) there is no moment of suspension as there is always at least one foot in contact with the ground. This makes the tölt very smooth and comfortable for the rider. An Icelandic which can walk, trot, canter/gallop and tölt is known as a "four gaited horse". Some Icelandic’s prefer trot, others prefer tölt. Correct training can improve the horse’s weakest gaits, but many Icelandic’s tölt completely naturally - it’s common to see foals tölting after their mothers. There are also Icelandic’s which are "five gaited". These horses can walk, trot, canter/gallop, tölt and pace. Pace is a two beat lateral gait with a moment of suspension. The footfalls are left hind - left front - - - - right hind - right front. The hooves on the same side land almost simultaneously. This is a fast gait used for racing, and some Icelandic’s can reach speeds of up to 30mph. Some horses pace slowly, which is uncomfortable for the rider and not encouraged. Flying pace is a gait for well-balanced, well-trained horses with good riders - it’s not generally used as a "day-to-day" travelling gait.

    Breed Society: www.ihsgb.co.uk


    (Credit: www.tireeimages.com)


    Camargue (France)
    The Camargue pony is named after a swampy region in the delta of the French river Rhone, in southern France, with lagoons and saltwater marshes, and the "white horses" of the Camargue have been known for ages. It is debatable though for just how long the ponies of the Camargue have been a breed.
    The earliest report of wild horses in the Camargue date back to the Roman occupation. Infusions of outside blood took place many times, usually through the use of foreign stallions to increase the size of the horses. On the other hand, the unusual and extreme environment of the delta may have eliminated much of it. As France's ties with northern Africa have been close for a long time, there may have been Barb stallions in service in the Camargue at various times.
    Crossbreds with the Camargue pony were used mainly for military purposes. The breed threatened to become extinct in the 19th century, when passionate and stubborn private breeders pursued a breeding program designed to preserve the old-type Camargue, or what they perceived as pure Camargue ponies, defying the ruling of the National Stud administration in Paris. While the traditional Camargue breeders and the political administration did not see eye to eye for a long time, Camargue ponies are nowadays bred without any outside influence, with the focus on what is believed to have been the original type.

    Breed Standard:
    Height – 13hh (132cm) to 14hh (142cm)
    Colour - Grey
    Conformation - they have a large head, with a straight or slightly convex profile. The eyes are large and expresive and the ears are broad and short with a broad base. The neck is short and muscular, deep at the base. The withers are pronounced and the back is straight and short. The croup is short and narrow, the chest wide and deep. The shoulder is rather straight and quite short.
    Limbs - well-jointed & strong with a long forearm and strong hooves.
    Hair – full, thick and long mane and tail.

    Breed Society: Association Des Eleveurs De Chevaux De Race Camargue


    (Credit: www.worldofhorses.co.uk)


    Merens (France)
    The Merens (also known as aričgeoise de Mérens, Mérenguais) is an ancient native breed of pony from the Ariege Pyrenees, in France, and looks very much like the British Fell pony - and also the Friesian. The breed is thought to have existed since prehistoric times and paintings of horses very similar to the Merens can be found on the walls of the cave at Niaux.
    The Merens is a strong, robust pony and completely black in colour, with no markings or variation in colour - they are very pretty with very attractive heads.

    Free Living Herds - The 'Authentic' Merens - The Merens breed is generally fortunate to be able to experience true 'herd life'. In Aričge, many of the ponies are led up to summer pastures to spend several months living free in the mountains, which is thought to contribute strongly to their balanced temperament as a breed. A Merens who has run free in the high Pyrenees is considered to be a truly authentic representative of the breed.

    Breed Standard:
    Head - Fine and distinguished, with a flat forehead, straight jaw, small ears and wide nostrils
    Conformation -Strong neck, well shaped withers, open breast-long but well coupled back, round croup
    Height – 13hh to 14.1hh
    Colours - Black (white markings are very unusual)
    Temperament - Gentle character and easy to school
    Distinguishing characteristics - A thick, hairy winter coat
    Main location - Midi-Pyrénées, Languedoc-Rousillon, Rhône-Alpes

    Merens Breed Society: SHERPA-France-Centre National du Merens - www.chevaldemerens.com


    (Credit: Breed Society)

    Breed standards are taken from breed societys, linked after each breed standard. History is taken from a mix of breed society and Wikipedia.
    Last edited by Red; 18-06-2010 at 15:38.
    Native pony addict!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    512

    Default

    I would like a Fjord,(as well as My friesian) they are lovely.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    11,510

    Default

    Oh, I've never heard of Merens before........I'll have one of those, please!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    west midlands
    Posts
    1,546

    Default

    i have a fjord though "effortless" and "energetic" are not words i'd use to describe them....i had to beat a trot out of him yesterday, even then we only did 3 strides and that was waaaaay too much effort for him.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    15,813

    Default

    Finnhorse?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Shetland, UK
    Posts
    5,425

    Default

    Icelandic horses are very forward going!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    5,274

    Default

    Dřle pony from Norway

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    In the real world....
    Posts
    3,542

    Default

    going to include the Connemara ?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    5,274

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueWicked View Post
    going to include the Connemara ?
    Yup,

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •