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Thread: Backing and breaking the untouched wild horse?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    18

    Default Backing and breaking the untouched wild horse?

    Hello , i am intersted to hear if anyone on forum has backed and broken the wild horse , i got a new forrest pony a while ago , who was just taken off the hills a few weeks before i bought him ,we are doing very well , just taking things very slow ,were now at stage were abouts to start lunge or long reining ,
    which did you do first lunge or long rein ? we have done join up everything i am doing is natural horsemanship ,
    How long did it take you to back and break your wild horse?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Hampshire, UK
    Posts
    27

    Default

    Yes, over the years, I've done a few unhandled horses.

    Usually I lunge first, but that's personal choice. I know others who long rein first, and that seems to work well for them. Do what works for you, and for the horse - if you're both happy & relaxed about it, it will be fine either way.

    I couldn't answer on times - it's been a few years since our last, and I don't remember exactly how long we've taken - it just takes as long as it takes.

  3. #3

    Default

    I did the same. NFs make excellent riding ponies. Having an unhandled horse is in someways quite good because you can do it all right from the off. There's no real set way to back a horse. Just take it slowly and don't be afraid.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Shetland, UK
    Posts
    5,568

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    Yup, we train wild ponies from hill to harness! Shetland ponies off the open hills.

    We are also currently working with Charlot - a rescued pony from the meat-fattening farms of France - his blog can be found on our website - www.thordale.co.uk

    Two years to pick up his back feet! Two years......

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Frances View Post
    Yup, we train wild ponies from hill to harness! Shetland ponies off the open hills.

    We are also currently working with Charlot - a rescued pony from the meat-fattening farms of France - his blog can be found on our website - www.thordale.co.uk

    Two years to pick up his back feet! Two years......

    Your website is great, really touched me , you do a amazing job x

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Brighton
    Posts
    3,037

    Default

    google Sarah Weston, shde wrote an excellent book on this subject and has worked with many wil NFs and exmoor ponehs!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    North East Essex.. innit!
    Posts
    2,260

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    I got Lexi as an untouched 3yo - her first experience of human contact was when she was herded into an enclosed space to be wormed twice a year - this did nothing for her trust in the human race!!!

    However, I noticed that she was not a nasty filly and she had a genuine eye.

    When she came to me she was stabled until I could touch her, then she was turned out - I bought her in May 2008, and by July 2008 she was backed. Once she decided to trust me, it was plain sailing, she was very easy to back and I lunged her first (I am not experienced enough to long rein), and tbh I have never really long-reined her. Only long-rein if you are experienced and confident......

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Cheshire
    Posts
    1,772

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    I had Bramble as a completly wild new forest when I bought her she had never even been haltered or had anything to do with people other than to be hearded off the forest. I started the backing process from day one by building up the trust etc from the start when she got to three I decided to lunge, but I actually found with Bramble longline lunging worked better for her.

  9. #9

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    i recently bought a pony straight off the mountain who had been untouched for all of his life (he was 5 when i got him)I lunged him for a few weeks with tack on etc then long reined him and when he got that i got on i spent a lot of time with him doing other things and i had him going under saddle within 6 weeks and going nicely.. he's now in his lovely new home out competing so it just shows these ponies who people think will never make anything do!
    Best of luck with the breaking, i hope it all goes well x

  10. #10

    Default

    Hi
    Start from lunging but if he accepts it well move on to the long reining exercise. keep every day session short (up to 2-5 mins) and extend each session's timing gradually. Main thing is that you do not overload your horse with info per day. give him time to digest the new knowledge over nite. and repeat same on the next day. if he struggles, repeat same exercise for 2-4 days. If the horse accepts it, you can move on first/ 2nd day to the mext training step.
    join up with your horse every day just before you start the exercise. After finishing the exercise for the day give the horse a reassuring pat on the head to leave a positive memory with him of the training session. this will help to build trust and gradually take the fear away. stay calm all the time. react calmly.
    the horse is looking for a safe spot, and you are the one for him. if you keep re-joining up with him on a regular basis, he will perceive you as a safe spot/place to be.


    Best of Luck,

    Joanna
    Last edited by Sez; 15-02-2011 at 14:15. Reason: removal of advertising

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