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Thread: Pictures of a good position over a low fence?

  1. #11
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    I used to have to go quite far forward on Flo because she kicked up with her back end and you flew if you were near that!



    Bum out of the saddle but not to far forward with hands giving but not thrown at him (B)


    Hands a bit iffy but Duchess likes to run out or stop so if you went too forward too soon......


    Tammy
    [FONT="Arial Narrow"][COLOR="purple"][B]Proud owner of Mr B - [url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p3FBAmksF8M[/url][/B][/COLOR][/FONT]

  2. #12

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    Oh no! I did a reply and it's disappeared!!
    Anywho, I like to think of jumping in 3 stages take off, mid air and landing
    I think the 1st stage can look a bit stood up but that's because you need to come out of the saddle so you don't get left behind but because of the horse coming up in front there is little room to fold.

    As the horse is in mid air your bum can shift back and your hands forward. The "mid air" movement is totally exaggerated because the jump is wide, in real life a jump this high is rarely that wide!

  3. #13
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    emmathechief - what a great photo - there are definitely tigers under that jump!
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v215/JuniperZ/Dunkery%20Hoopoe/Hoopysignature.jpg

  4. #14
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    i was told that it is a 'fold' and not a 'lift' which helped my position to click for me. Cant find any pictures but i try to think of it as shifting my bum back rather than up and folding at the hips.
    ♥ ♥ Curly Wurly ♥ ♥
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  5. #15
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    To be honest I think it's easy to be too fussy about your jumping position.

    A few things are essential - that your lower leg is secure beneath you, that your balance is independent from your hands/reins, that you follow the movement of the horse ((rather than "jumping ahead" or getting left behind)), and that your hands/arms are "elastic" enough for the horse to make his shape over the jump without catching him in the mouth or stopping him from extending his neck as required. If you are in balance with the horse and not hampering his movement, there's no need to worry excessively about the finer details.

    And as people have mentioned, what makes a jumping position "effective" often depends on the individual horse and jumping style. For example when jumping a green or difficult horse or one who is prone to refusing, your position will need to be more "defensive" than normal. If you're riding a point-and-shoot horse who will sort out his own striding and make a nice fluid jump, you can afford to worry a bit more about the other details.

    For your average horse jumping 2ft from canter should barely be more effort than just another stride. For that reason you, as the rider, don't need to do much either. The "standing up" style that you're describing isn't a problem with small jumps so long as you have your lower leg beneath you and are giving with your hands. I prefer to see people being a bit too "upright" over a jump, than those over-enthusiastic riders who literally throw themselves forwards and lie on the horse's neck over a small crosspole
    Last edited by joosie; 20-09-2011 at 17:33.

  6. #16
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    I think it's important not to 'stand up' and get ahead of the movement over a smaller fence, in all honesty over a little fence you don't NEED to do an awful lot. But i agree with CWR fold and not lift, which is what i was getting at when i said important not to stand up. I'll see if i have any.

    This is a tiny log



    Tiny upright



    Although it does of course go wrong sometimes hehe


  7. #17
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    I have a couple since I never jump very big!

    Slightly weird jump from horse!




    I get out of the saddle a bit much as a rule though, however, this is because when we started jumping the front end jumped 2' and the back 4'!
    Kat

    Small Horse - big heart, big personality!

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by palmerlover52 View Post
    I think it might be where I tend to do this weird 'stand up, superman' style jump position and they're trying to get me to get my butt back
    Hmmm that sounds horribly familiar!!


    293361_10150280686061455_729686454_7858396_1260487 82_n by viscousbadgerjelly, on Flickr

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrumpetSchnoz View Post
    Hmmm that sounds horribly familiar!!


    293361_10150280686061455_729686454_7858396_1260487 82_n by viscousbadgerjelly, on Flickr
    STOP TAKING PHOTOS OF ME!!!!

    That is exactly my jump position, although sometimes I like to look like I'm keeling over dead as well. Wll try to get some photos up.

  10. #20
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    Okay how is this? This felt okay when I was doing it but maybe I'm a bit far out of the saddle? Unfortunately that's about as down as my heels get



    My lower leg has slipped here...a bit high up again?


    Ironically, this is my first ever jump lesson....is about as good as it gets!


    Note these are the best photos I have...general position is a lot lot worse but so I know what to aim for!

    I seem to jump better on Connor (this grey)...he tends to get in quite deep and pings his back end up so I ride a bit more defensively, whereas Elise jumps very slowly and flatly so I think I throw myself up her neck in a go faster attempt lol

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