View Poll Results: Is my jumping positions good or bad?

Voters
0. You may not vote on this poll
  • Good

    0 0%
  • Bad...!

    0 0%
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Is My Position Bad?-Photos Included

  1. #1

    Question Is My Position Bad?-Photos Included

    603445_398070073585370_1683776698_n.jpg<---- My butt bounces out of the saddle as he canters off, but I can sit perfectly after this stride
    561417_398070230252021_684849673_a.jpg <---- Same here
    599931_398068253585552_1225597755_n.jpg <---- What is my landing position like?
    480072_398069820252062_183304629_n.jpg <---- here too
    394742_398069463585431_120117164_n.jpg<---- I am sitting here, is this bad?


    Dont be afraid to be harsh

    All comments apreciated!

    Sorry for bad quality photos, but I want my face blurred out.

    I have no other photos of me jumping so far.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    3,499

    Default

    It's hard to tell from pictures, but you look like a beginner. Everybody has to start somewhere. Are you just learning to jump? Are you having lessons? There are lots of useful things you can practice to get ready for jumping.

    Tie a knot in your reins and let them go. Stay sitting in the saddle and go over a jump. As the horse goes up reach forward and clap your hands together under his neck, then sit up again. This is especially good if you can set up a grid. This teaches you to 'fold' over the jump.

    Practice trotting and cantering in 2-point or light seat. This helps your position and helps your balance.

    If you have your own horse you can lunge him/her over jumps. Try to count the strides so you can see when to 'fold'. If you don't have your own horse see if you can watch other people jump, either in a lesson, or on youtube.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    nottinghamshire
    Posts
    4,285

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nirikina View Post
    Tie a knot in your reins and let them go. Stay sitting in the saddle and go over a jump. As the horse goes up reach forward and clap your hands together under his neck, then sit up again. This is especially good if you can set up a grid. This teaches you to 'fold' over the jump.
    I actually disagree with this (sorry nirikina!) - that would teach you just to lean forwards and down, and just generally get ahead of the movement imo...

    For the height you're jumping B&B you don't need to be folding overly so (as in flat to the neck!), infact sitting up is fine as long as you're not hindering the horse Try to keep your heels down a bit more as that will make you feel a bit more stable over the fence and help you on landing, and (like nirikina suggested) practice riding two-point - stood in your stirrups - in walk, trot and canter without having to rely on your hands to balance yourself, and it gives you a stronger leg and core

    Jumping is one of those things that just comes from experience, and how much you give and fold should alter depending on the size of fence - you don't want to do an impression of John Whitaker going over a 7ft puissance wall over a 2ft high cross pole, because there's just not enough air time! So just keep practicing going with your horse

  4. #4

    Default

    Can you practice cantering around and over poles in your 2 point position? keeping the rhythm, your hands still and your heels down.

    You have to look up and pretend the poles arent there. Start combining a grid of 3 / 4 poles and practice keeping the rhythm over the length on the grid.

    Pop the very last pole into a tiny fence (1 foot cross) and come round again, keeping in your 2 point, keeping your rhythm, ignoring that it is a fence. Feel where the horse lifts off, but at this height you don't have to worry about folding when you remain in your 2 point. build up the grid to 4 / 4 fences and practice maintaining the 2 point throughout the grid, in both the canter strides and over the fence.

    Gradually pop up the fence, keep your rhythm, keep your 2 point, looking up.

    Once you can canter through a grid and over a small course of jumps in a very secure 2 point with very still lower leg, you should start to think about folding. The more secure your lower leg is before you start this, the less likely it is that you will swing your leg forward and collapse onto horse's neck.

    When you fold, remember to do it from the hip and not the waist. Like a Barbie doll, think of your body being made up from 2 halves, the top and the bottoms, with the moveable bit being the hips. Keep your shoulders back. Imagine there is a rod in your back that is un bendable, therefore when you fold your back should stay straight from lower back to shoulders, and you shouldn't curl forward and have saggy shoulders.

    Remember to give with your hands. At smaller heights you don't have to worry so much about it but it doesn't hurt to do it. Think about pushing your hands forward. If it helps at the start keep your hands on wither side of the horses neck and run your hands up the neck as he stretches out. Do this on small jumps just to get the feel of pushing out.

    As your body comes forward, the hands should also go forward. Think of it as your body pushing your hands out the way to make room for your body folding.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Newcastle
    Posts
    1,025

    Default

    Keep that lower leg forward, and even though it's not Pony Club correct, turn your toes out to stop those knees gripping!

    In terms of position, over a fence the height in the photos, you only really need to give with your hands and raise out of the saddle (even just lighting your seat completely). When you give, don't push forward, but in an arch, just like the horse's neck... So forward and down. It should be more of a movement with the bigger fence.

    You really don't need to fold your top half at this level. You fold to give your hands further forward and down (as the fences go up) and to come out of the saddle more (again, in relation to the height).

    If you do feel the need to fold, don't let your breast bone go in front of the wither. Ultimately, this would put all your weight on the front as the horses legs go over the fence - can make them knock them. Also, do not give or lighten until you feel the horses change in movement (not when you think it is going to jump)....

    Good luck and keep practicing - you'll easily get the hang of it!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    New Hampshire USA
    Posts
    36

    Default

    I guess I come from a different world. If you grip with your knees,then you lose your lower leg and end up pivoting off your knee and becoming unbalanced. Balance is key. The person who suggested you tie a knot in your reins, was trying to get you off the horse's mouth. This looks like a schooling situation where the horse does not need much guidance from you. If this is the case,work on your lower leg, toes up but forward. Keep the leg steady, you look like you don't swing yours too much. The upper body flexes at the hip, not waist. Keep your chin up, always looking at the next jump...do not look down! When the horse rises beneath you, flex your hips to stay square to your horse. Don't try to help the horse yet...get balanced first!

  7. #7

    Default

    Sit up dead straight until the horse takes off, if anything lean a little back.... if you are leaning forward and it puts in a dirty stop, you have nowhere to go except forwards and over a shoulder! The best jumping position is to remain "upright" as the horse bascules, ie, if the horse were to be taken away, you would be able to stand upright without falling forwards or backwards. Gridwork is good as it will incorporate lots of little jumps in quick succession.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    New Hampshire USA
    Posts
    36

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by patchypony View Post
    Sit up dead straight until the horse takes off, if anything lean a little back.... if you are leaning forward and it puts in a dirty stop, you have nowhere to go except forwards and over a shoulder! The best jumping position is to remain "upright" as the horse bascules, ie, if the horse were to be taken away, you would be able to stand upright without falling forwards or backwards. Gridwork is good as it will incorporate lots of little jumps in quick succession.
    Very good explanation! Do you teach?

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by patlet View Post
    Very good explanation! Do you teach?
    No.... but thank you - and I don't actually jump either (it scares the hell out of me! ) But I DO watch others and listen to what they are told!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    In the real world....
    Posts
    584

    Default

    ditto above

    the best thing i was every taught was to feel as you are leaning back slightly approaching the jump. People worry about 'folding' but over that height you dont need to fold, as the height goes up you will find you fold naturally anyway. One of the most dangerous faults is to fold and tip forward before take off as it leaves you nowhere to go should something go wrong. Just remember to allow your hands to follow the horse's mouth, that doesnt mean throw your hands forward either, you want to keep a contact both on take off and over the fence but allow your hand to follow as the horse stretches. The main thing I take from your pictures is that you aren't riding the landing and where you say your bum is bounced out of the saddle, it isnt, you are collapsing forward. One of my worst faults. So - on landing think sit up sit up sit up and pick a point to ride to, keeping straight and maintaining your canter. Aways remember, the first stride away from a jump is the first stride in which you are setting up for the next. Core stability exercises will help with this also, as will grid work and a good instructor.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •