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Thread: Picking up feet meltdown!

  1. #1

    Default Picking up feet meltdown!

    My 3.5 (should know better) year old is currently have a bit of meltdown about having her feet picked up.

    Farrier came 6 weeks ago and she was absolutely good as gold, perfect pony

    I've been practising picking her feet up every night since to get her more responsive to the "UP" command and everything was going quite well......

    UNTIL farrier came again last week and she just went nuts. Fine picking her feet up until he put her foot between his legs then came the nutty hopping everywhere - she wasn't having any of it! Needless to say, he had to leave with her unfinished.

    Literally cannot think of an explanation other than, teenage rebellion or more worryingly, that she could be in pain??

    Practising since has been pretty much the same, lots of hopping and pulling away. Just on fronts, completely fine with backs.

    Any suggestions on what I can do to ease the situation??

  2. #2
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    Wouldn't have thought it was a pain reaction, if she's otherwise sound. Sounds more like a teenage strop. My yearling had his feet done as a baby just before I bought him at 6 months and according to his breeder he was an angel. However, when my farrier tried to trim his feet a couple of months later he was a complete nightmare and the fourth foot remained somewhat unfinished! Since then I have just practised over and over and over picking up his feet, gradually lengthening the amount of time I keep hold of each foot. Perhaps, as it is just the fronts, she finds it harder to balance with the weight on one front with the other one picked up?

    I think with youngsters it is just a matter of persistance, doing it every single day, lots and lots of praise when they do it right and if they do it wrong just keep repeating until you get even a few seconds of the "right" behaviour then lots of praise and leave it there for the day. That's what I did with my baby and although it seemed as though we were barely making progress, now I can look back and see just how much better he is!
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  3. #3
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    how big is she?

  4. #4
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    My Suffolk [just 3] is currently going through something similar, that said I never give in no matter how stubborn she gets.
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  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wally View Post
    how big is she?
    She's about 15.1 at the moment and shouldn't get too much bigger. She's always struggled balancing with her fronts but was getting the hang of until this little fiasco.

  6. #6

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    My boy did it so I started doing what the farrier would do every day. I borrowed and old rasp and picked up his feet, tapped them, knocked them, pretended to rasp them, put them through my legs, stretched out to the front etc. until it became second nature. They get to that rebellious stage where they just say "shan't" to anything that isn't done regularly but with repetition you'll get over it been there!

    Edit - my boys is now that good that the new farrier didn't know he was entire until he looked between his legs...

    You'll get there x

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by leanne View Post

    Edit - my boys is now that good that the new farrier didn't know he was entire until he looked between his legs...
    No reason he should be messing for the farrier just because he's got his danglies...

    With my babies, I tend to have the feet done in pairs in the early days, so its easier for them to handle. I feel having all 4 done in one go can be a bit much sometimes for their tiny little brains
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  8. #8
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    If she's 15.1 then my theory won't apply to her then.

    Just some smaller horses can struggle when the leg is taken out to the side and gripped in the knees.

  9. #9

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    Good news everyone!! She picked up her feet like a normal horse this morning! A teeny bit of resistance but much much better. My dad had a go at picking her fronts up last night to try her with a man and she was really good with him too so we're getting there!

    Will find myself an old rasp and have some more practising - great idea

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