Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 53

Thread: Your Story

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    2,125

    Default Your Story

    What's your story? Did you have an accident? or were you born with difficulties, learnt to adapt while you were little or as a teen or adult?

    This is mine.

    This is long, so get yourself a cup of tea/coffe and a biscuit/sandwich....

    Up until 23/2/1993 I was as able-bodied as the next person. enjoying my job, working with horses in a riding school.

    I was meant to be doing the horses for the night classes, but at the end of the wroking day, before the start of the Evening, I was riding an ex-polo pony... we were in canter, and being a bit lazy, I asked him to lengthen his stride, but had forgotten about him being ex-polo...he shot off up the long side of the indoor school, and on going round the corner, he fell....somersaulted, and landed on top of me, upside down.... i think we were both knocked out...don't really remember.... Anyway got carted off to hospital in a car (owner was too mean to call an ambulance, and failed to believe i was in any pain....)

    When in hospital it was revealed that I had broken my Acetabulum (lining of the hip cup/pelvis) blah blah blah...was in hospital for a month, had surgery to fix metal work inside to hold it together, and was told that I'd never ride again.

    For a year, I couldnt.. I was on crutches for about 4 months, I had infections, for two months i was infection free, then I started having a really weird pain...it would be really intense for a couple days (real go-to-bed-with-painkillers pain) then after a couple days it would subside... Iconsulted my GP/consultant and A/E about, and they all said everything was fine.... This went on for 3 weeks, until it was so bad, that my physio arranged for a home visit from my GP, for the next morning... she phoned for an ambulance, and b/c I'd been there before, they got intouch with my consultant, who basically ignored me and left me in A/E for hours, until one of his registrars appeared and said I needed an intense course of physio, and that I was being transfered to another hospital.... the other hospital couldnt take me that day, so was admitted to a ward... (this is where the fun begins..) I was given a blood test, which results said i had a really aggressive infection, the plan for tranferring was abandoned while they carried out test/xrays/scans..even made me radioactive for one particular scan - even that was inconclusive.... in the end, 10 days after admittance, they operated and found the biggest abcess ever, ready to burst and cause Peritonitis.... unfortunetly, yes they'd found it, but the damage was done, by the time i left hospital my leg had already shortend by half an inch... It had caused a condition called AVASUCALR NECROSIS - which is a bone disease, and causes the bone to die and crumble away. For the next few years I was 2and a half - 3inches shorter on my right leg....

    I got on a horse again the following December after the accident, but only in walk for 30mins... Just because I had to.....

    A year after the accident, in the March I started going to a "rival" school to ride again...couldnt face going to the yard where I worked, to have people asking questions...

    At first I could only ride narrow horses, as my hips were so tight... getting on was a problem in itself, as i couldnt stretch, and I also had to re-learn how to ride, and figure out what my hip in it's current state would be like..... I literally joined an adults beginner class.... Later that year I developed another abcess, which was dealt with more effeciantly.. and I was back on a horse within two months of surgery!

    I rode at the riding school for about 3years, I helped out on occassions, and had private lessons, even rode a horse the instructor didnt think I should, as she hadhistory of throwing her riders into the gallery...and yes, I admit i was a bit concerned, but she was a total babe, and behaved herself... I rode her 3 times and then she was sold.... I dont know why she behaved with me, but she made me ride properly and have her focused on what she was meant to be doing.... perhaps she made me believe in myself....

    After then, I started riding a friends horse at the yard I'm at now, I think it was time for me to move on, from Riding school horses to privately owned... Mick was a 16hh IDX and I had known him from when he came onto the yard I'd previously worked at, my freind had bought him as a second horse for her son, but with him being at school, there were days he couldnt ride, and Mick needed the work... we had some fun.... he was a great lad...

    By this time, my hip had stabled and I walked with a stick...

    I rode Mick for 3years and then the old pony died, so my friend said she wanted to start riding Mick, that was fine, as I had too moved on to another horse in the yard... Mick had given me lots of confidence, but I felt I needed something with bit more oomph, and so started riding a horse who shall be known on here as The Oldie*... He was 20 when I first started riding him... 15.2hh and fat!!! The first few times I rode him, I wondered what I'd taken on...imagine... you're in a stubble feild, and you cant get the ****** horse out of a walk, or barely into a poor trot.... didnt want to use a stick, as didnt know what he was like..... (it's always in the back of my mind that if i should fall off agian, my hip would shatter....) anyway over the next few weeks we got to know each other and now, 10 years on, I would trust him with my life... He turns 30 this year, and is in great health.

    I realise I have probably left a lot of information out, but 14years is a lot to remember.......

    I had the metal work removed after 8 years.....and had a total hip replacement Nov 06.... couldnt ride for 3 months...when i did the difference was fantastic...unfortunelty 2.5years ago I fell and shattered the femur bone in which caused a "peri pherial fracture", so was again out of the saddle.... and more recently had a knee replacement on the same leg, out of the saddle once more, wont be long til im back in it!!

    Dont tell me you feel sorry for me, nor pity me... Im alive, and can still (and I will again) ride my beloved horses!

    *ETA this guy died June 07 at the grand age of nearly 31.
    Last edited by Julz; 10-11-2009 at 11:13.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    2,125

    Default

    This is my Xray with the metal work still in place


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Barnsley, UK
    Posts
    3,974

    Default

    Wow Julz, interesting tale.
    It's great that you got back in the saddle, such an inspriration.
    And crikey, what an xray!

    I'm lucky *touch wood* that I havn't sustained something as life changing as that.
    I've only broken ribs and an arm in the past.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    2,125

    Default

    Just made myself cry thinking about The Oldie!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Co.Durham
    Posts
    1,837

    Default

    My god you are so brave, i think my confidence would be shattered by then

    Hoilday cottage in Teesdale- www.thecote.co.uk

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    North Yorkshire
    Posts
    8,371

    Default

    The metal in your x-ray is quite scary! Good luck for getting back in the saddle after your knee op

    I am the result of parents who are both mutant-gene carriers As a child, I had a lot of injuries and sprains, but my mum thought it was normal. It wasn't until I was eight that it began to turn into a chronic condition, starting with my knee. I would have periods where I felt "normal" (this is "normal for me", as I've realised as I've gotten older that many people actually have periods where they're not in pain or discomfort at all ), interspersed with blocks of several weeks where my knee would "click", balloon up and leave me unable to walk. I was initially diagnosed with "water on the knee", then with with torn cartlidge, and I was actually booked in to have keyhole surgery on my 13th birthday after a particularly long period of problems, although it was cancelled at the last minute.
    When I was fifteen I was diagnosed with hypermobility syndrome, and basically told "there's nothing we can do, so you'll have to live with it", and informed that I should consider myself lucky, as hypermobile people are great gymnasts and ballet dancers This was back in a time when there wasn't a lot of understanding of the difference between being "hypermobile" and having "hypermobility syndrome", which includes chronic pain and a variety of connective tissue problems. My mum and I were fuming after the appointment that the doctor was so blase about the fact that the pain left me exhausted and depressed, and my school work was suffering.

    Between the ages of 16 and 20, my health went on a downhill slide. As I've gotten older, more parts of my body have become more and more unstable to the point that I have to strap myself together when I am being active (which includes wrist and thumb splints for typing and eating). I was under the care of a rheumatologist for years, but really she had little understanding of the condition (and used to take blood from me every six months because she was determined to prove that I had rheumatoid arthritis ). All she could do was refer me for more physiotherapy (I've been having physio since I was eight, and it's never been helpful for me, as in all that time I've only ever come across one therapist who actually understood the condition and it's effects - usually the therapists end up dislocating something and then not being sure how to manipulate it back into place ) and keep me on a rolling prescription of painkillers, which my GP now manages.

    When I was twenty, I was so depressed by how futile my life seemed, I was considering suicide. I couldn't cope with being in pain all the time, none of my family or friends seemed to believe that I was struggling, and if my then-OH didn't have time to cook (or if he started kicking off about having to "do everything for me ), I simply didn't eat. I hated not being able to do things "normal" 21 year olds did. I hated that my GP had organised me a wheelchair, as I was having so much trouble getting around; it felt like giving up. I hated being accused of attention seeking. I hated not having the energy to go out and socialise - I lost a good many friends over it I also came close to losing my job, and it felt like for the rest of my life I was going to be a burden on the people I loved. It sounds quite pathetic and self-indulgent reading back on it, but I felt like my medical problems over-shadowed everything else in my life, and that it had taken away my control over my present and future.

    When I was twenty-one, I decided it was time to take things into my own hands, and my mum and I paid for me to have a private consultation with a specialist in London. It cost an arm and a leg, but he diagnosed me with hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and was actually incredibly helpful. That appointment turned my life around.
    As a result, I spent a week as an in-patient in my local hospital, learning coping mechanisms, getting fitted for the splints and supports that the specialist had recommended, and had an appointment with Occupational Therapy to get me equipment for around the house. With my diagnosis letter in hand, I finally managed to convince my employers that I wasn't making everything up, and I now have a lot of support to do my job, as well as equipment to make it manageable.
    Over time, I've learnt what I can cope with and what I can't. I always try to do too much, as I've never really gotten over the idea that I shouldn't talk about it, and always feel that I can't let on that there's something wrong with me, because no one will believe me. I'm now in a supportive relationship, and my OH never makes me feel bad for asking for help, and does a LOT for the horses even though he doesn't really like them. If anything, he's more likely to get frustrated with me for not asking Without his support, I just couldn't have horses anymore.
    The friends I have managed to keep are wonderful and understand if I don't feel capable of going out with them after I explained it using the "Spoon Theory" from ButYouDontLookSick.com . During the week, I tend to stay home in my free time as working exhausts me and leaves me hurting, but I try to catch up with friends at the weekends, as I can recoup my lost "spoons" a bit easier then.

    I'm not going to wake up one day and suddenly be well, no matter how often I wish it, but by keeping my body as active as I can cope with, and taking advantage of tools like my wheelchair to enable me to get out and about, without becoming dependent on it, I'll stay healthier for longer. I'm nearly 25 and the last four years have been a really steep learning curve for me, in trying to learn what I can cope with and how to balance "things I want to do" with "things I need to do" and trying to avoid injuring myself or exhausting myself in the process. From an emotional point of view, I'm in a much better state these days, although I do have my moments (usually late in the week) when I'm so exhausted and hurt so badly that all I can do is cry over how I want to be "normal" and be able to cook a meal by myself, or have a bath without a bath lift and having to be supervised by my OH when I get in and out to make sure I'm okay.

    Gosh that was a bit of a waffle
    [CENTER][IMG]http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y228/Gothic_Sez/Signatures/Signature01.png[/IMG]
    [FONT="Book Antiqua"][COLOR="Sienna"]He's of the colour of the nutmeg. And of the heat of the ginger...he is pure air and fire; and the dull elements of earth and water never appear in him
    *Salsa* 19th April 1998 - 7th July 2013[/COLOR][/FONT]
    Forever Loved and Never Forgotten

    [/CENTER]

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Co.Durham
    Posts
    1,837

    Default

    So with your condition you experience a lot of pain and and limited mobility, really curious as to how you fit horses into your life, how do you ride etc without the worry of hurting yourself? I've never heard of this condition before, would be interested to look it up. Well done for making the most of things

    Hoilday cottage in Teesdale- www.thecote.co.uk

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    North Yorkshire
    Posts
    8,371

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lolly-lu View Post
    So with your condition you experience a lot of pain and and limited mobility, really curious as to how you fit horses into your life, how do you ride etc without the worry of hurting yourself? I've never heard of this condition before, would be interested to look it up. Well done for making the most of things
    Me?
    Pig-headedness and painkillers mostly I refuse point blank to give up the horses, and my last physiotherapist encouraged me to keep riding for as long as I physically can. My OH is fab and does so much for the horses - mucking out, carrying feed and filling the bins, poo picking, etc. so that I can keep them. If I didn't have his help and support, I'd have to have them on full livery, and just couldn't afford it. My YO is also brilliant and does lots of little things like me, such as putting hay and straw on my pallets when I order it, and turning out/fetching in if my OH can't make it.
    I also have a friend who comes up and helps out regularly. I think it's a reasonably fair trade-off: she gets some horsey time and I get an extra hand

    Riding and other things that I do, like rugging and mixing feeds, are painful and difficult, but at the moment I still get an awful lot of pleasure out of doing it. I've not ridden regularly for more than two years, mostly because I'm too exhausted or sore to ride, but it's a bit catch 22, as if I rode more often, my muscles would tone up for riding, and find it a bit easier to hold my body together. I ride when I can, but still often have subluxations and dislocations (typically shoulder and ankle). At the moment, it's typical that if I ride one day, I then spend the next couple of days out of my tree on my maximum dosage of pills and have to have a day or two resting. I'm really hopeful that now I've lost so much weight, I'm going to feel the benefit of not carrying so much fat around when the spring finally gets here again, and because I have more good days when the weather is warmer, I'm planning to start having a regular lesson again, even if it's only once a fortnight, in the hope that it'll give me something to aim for, and I can gradually build up how much riding I'm doing.

    Most of my gear is specifically bought in order to make life at the yard a bit easier - grippy brushes and thick hoofpicks and the horses pick their feet up on a verbal command so that I don't have to bend so far; rope reins which are easier to grip than tradional reins; things organised in such a way that I don't have to bend too often or walk far to get to them, etc. It seems completely unfair that the winter is the time that I'm always worst, as the cold and damp effects my joints in much the same way as it does with arthritis, and it's always the time of year that there's most to do with the horses. I feel awful that my OH gives so much of his time for my hobby, but I'm incredibly grateful that he does
    [CENTER][IMG]http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y228/Gothic_Sez/Signatures/Signature01.png[/IMG]
    [FONT="Book Antiqua"][COLOR="Sienna"]He's of the colour of the nutmeg. And of the heat of the ginger...he is pure air and fire; and the dull elements of earth and water never appear in him
    *Salsa* 19th April 1998 - 7th July 2013[/COLOR][/FONT]
    Forever Loved and Never Forgotten

    [/CENTER]

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Edinburgh
    Posts
    2,125

    Default

    Wow... What a story!

    My ex also has EDS... even though he's been diagnosed as "bad" when he was a kid he had a lot of stabilising ops for his knees that would just dislocate at inappropiate times... he could also dislocate them at will scaring the pants off his friends, and apparently took pur joy in that fact... but in doing this he was also weakening them. As well as having EDS, he also ruptured hia Anterior Cruiciate Ligament, falling over drunk in the street ( ) and has had that repaired twice. but now the same knee is starting to lock more frequently and give way, sometimes he stands up and doesnt feel that the knee could take his weight.... (these are the symptoms I had prior to the replacement) he's a bit of a male airhead if you like, despite being told by his surgeon that he will need a TKR in 4/5 years, he doesnt get that with these syptmons it's more realistic that the TKR could come sooner than he thinks.. course i dont know this for a fact, but he's awaiting a call back from his surgeon for a date for clinic after explaining this to his seccy (surgeons seccy not ex's). But going from my experience, I reckon he's in for a shock.

    However what im trying to say, is that you Sez have this condidtion a whole lot more worse than he does, and i thought he was bad.

    If i was nearer to you, I would love to come and help you out.

    im on constant painkillers at the moment, but you've been on them your whole life... I cant even begin to imagine how that must feel.

    Huge to you.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Devon
    Posts
    1,476

    Default

    wow these are really inspiring stories and really show the power of horses! and the drive they appear to give to people to get back on julz and sez really admire you both for carrying on with your horses.

    5'6" fly rugs and show rugs for sale PM me for details.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •