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Thread: Riding with multiple sclerosis

  1. #11
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    Hello and welcome

    I have no personal experience of MS but I did used to ride out with someone who suffered from it, being able to ride totally changed her life and we spent many an afternoon meandering around the countryside, I was most put out when she moved away and I lost my hacking buddy!

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Biddy View Post
    I have MS, have had it for nearly 40 years. I am very weak on my left side and have had to change lots of things but all sorted now, biggest enemy is getting overtired and of course the wobbles with my left leg caused problems for the horse for a while. I have just found different ways of doing things and no longer jump as balance is poor. Riding means I can get to places I couldn't possibly walk to and is the best therapy ever. Where are you based? Oh.... much welcome to the board!
    It's great to hear from you I'm based just East of Nottingham. I wondered what sort of changes you'd made to help? I use a gel seat saver to help me to stay in the saddle a bit better, I have a RS Tor to hold onto in case of a spook or stumble and wear a body protector at all times!! A few falls and injuries have made me a bit more careful! Getting overtired is a pain isn't it!! After a 30 min session of riding I am absolutely exhausted and look as if I've been in a marathon! However getting about using my horses legs instead of mine feel like freedom from leaden like legs and feet that stick to the ground! And being around my horse just makes me smile so much - he's such a lovely character.

  3. #13

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    Well we have so much in common! I'm based near Devizes in Wiltshire. I had a nasty accident with my Andalusian four years ago so as a compromise hubbie only agreed that I could carry on riding if I went Western, so I have the horn and big saddle to hang on to. I so miss my dressage though! My present horse is a Criollo and a saint to put up with me, we hack lots and do a bit of Western stuff but I'm also training him 'English' on the side! I had a huge mounting block made for me, one in the school too and am a dab hand at climbing on gates. I also carry a schooling whip or twig to give a bit of left leg help. Instead of a body protector I wear a Point Two gilet. I always let someone know where I'm headed and tuck a high viz tabard in my coat pocket. When riding English I wear my suede chaps as they provide a bit of extra 'glue'. I can't feel my feet so if it's a bad day I ride without stirrups. But isn't it wonderful to be able to walk without the ploughing through the water feeling and having to watch every exhausting step?!

  4. #14

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    I don't have experience with it, but I was friends with a girl on another forum when she was first diagnosed with it, and since being diagnosed, she's gone on fantastically, and was one of the reserves for the paralympics for Australia. Her fb page is http://www.facebook.com/pages/Elizab...866360?fref=ts if you ever want to talk to someone going through similar stuff!


    RIP Adam - 25th October 1990- 8th October 2012

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Biddy View Post
    Well we have so much in common! I'm based near Devizes in Wiltshire. I had a nasty accident with my Andalusian four years ago so as a compromise hubbie only agreed that I could carry on riding if I went Western, so I have the horn and big saddle to hang on to. I so miss my dressage though! My present horse is a Criollo and a saint to put up with me, we hack lots and do a bit of Western stuff but I'm also training him 'English' on the side! I had a huge mounting block made for me, one in the school too and am a dab hand at climbing on gates. I also carry a schooling whip or twig to give a bit of left leg help. Instead of a body protector I wear a Point Two gilet. I always let someone know where I'm headed and tuck a high viz tabard in my coat pocket. When riding English I wear my suede chaps as they provide a bit of extra 'glue'. I can't feel my feet so if it's a bad day I ride without stirrups. But isn't it wonderful to be able to walk without the ploughing through the water feeling and having to watch every exhausting step?!
    We do have a lot in common!!! My body protector is a Point 2 gilet and I wear full chaps made from deerskin which helps me to grip a bit better. I did a few unaffiliated dressage competitions a few years ago at Intro and Prelim level (canter was a bit tricky and even more so now as I haven't cantered for over 2 years since my last big fall!!) I have a schooling whip too to make sure he can hear my puny legs I'm using a dressage saddle at the moment which is quite deep but someone did recommend thinking about a Western saddle.... My right foot is pretty numb and I have a real job with rising trot - I get left behind so my contact gets unsteady and my poor horse wonders what's going on and thinks I'm putting the brakes on! Very frustrating!! But yes it's lovely to feel a bit of speed.... I used to be very sporty before ms and a bit of a speed freak Lovely to find someone who understands!!

  6. #16

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    I have a theory that people who get MS often come from overdoing it fitness-wise. I was super fit before it got me. Do you look after your horse or do you have help? Shall we talk about the dynamics of carrying a water bucket?!*

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Biddy View Post
    I have a theory that people who get MS often come from overdoing it fitness-wise. I was super fit before it got me. Do you look after your horse or do you have help? Shall we talk about the dynamics of carrying a water bucket?!*
    Well I have a reputation for being... what's the word... determined....? I look after him as much as possible myself - things like mucking out and poo picking - very slowly and with the occasional trip up!! It's amazing how a wheelbarrow feels more acceptable as a walking aid!! I use a porter's trolley to wheel his water bucket about.

    I can get where you're coming from about burn out. I have a similar theory which relates to being career/work focused/obsessed. All my working life I put everything into my job/career - stupid hours, crazy deadlines, travelling miles and too much stress. I think it all caught up on me eventually What was your life like before ms reared its ugly head?

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by toraf View Post
    I don't have experience with it, but I was friends with a girl on another forum when she was first diagnosed with it, and since being diagnosed, she's gone on fantastically, and was one of the reserves for the paralympics for Australia. Her fb page is http://www.facebook.com/pages/Elizab...866360?fref=ts if you ever want to talk to someone going through similar stuff!
    Wow - that's incredible!! Thanks for the link - I'll definitely take a look

  9. #19

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    Like you I worked long hours as a vet theatre nurse, one day off a week, cycled 5 miles, swam, ran two laps of Cadwell Park with boyfriend and played squash. Was also studying for my BHSAI (failed on the equitation!). When that crisis settled down got a desk job but within a few months couldn't control the clutch in my car and tooka real nosedive symptoms-wise for many years. Was totally off my feet for a couple of years then learned to walk again. How long have you had it?

  10. #20

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    I've just pm'd you

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