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Thread: youngsters, how old to start hoof trimming?

  1. #11
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    Annie was about 10-11 months.

  2. #12
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    Here's an 8-week old, friend's foal, awwwwwwe

    pict1121.jpg



  3. #13
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    mine was done just under 2 but she needed them doing a lot sooner - they were a bit long and a state tbh.

    shes had them done twice since i had her - so again in jan

    she is a bit of an **** until yesterday - i can now pick 3 out of 4 up confidently

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by joosie View Post
    Interesting! I wasn't really aware foals that young could have "bad feet" - looking at all of ours at 6 months they just look, well, normal!

    ETA - can anyone tell me then what you are looking for when you assess a foal's feet? What is good and what is bad?
    Looking at the pic I posted above you can see the toe is already quite long, even though he's only a few weeks old.

    Personally, for Ghost (who is my only personal choice experience of a very little foal) I was looking at conformation and movement rather than at the hooves themselves. She was a little upright through the pastern and maybe because of her gaited heritage not fully straight in her movement - I'd always read that if you help they grow straight through correct and continuous balancing then this can be remedied without strain on the legs. Seems to have worked for her as she's 2.5 now and straight as an arrow despite her injuries (edited to add that injuries were all accidents, not strain related lol!!).

    Having said all that, Lance has atrocious feet when I got him and completely wonky movement. He was 2.5 already but we still straightened him out no problem, though also needed some chiro and physio alongside the correct schooling to achieve the complete equl balance of left and right so that all wearing on all hoof quarters is even when self-trimming.

    So it's probably all for nothing with Ghost, but it hasn't harmed and it's routine so whatever
    Last edited by Soot; 20-12-2012 at 22:11.



  5. #15
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    Thanks Soot, this has really piqued my interest!

  6. #16
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    I guess, as with everything, it comes down to diet and environment as much as genetics. Some have better feet than others, and are less likely to have foot issues as babies if they're getting all the vitamins and minerals their feet need to develop and are out on good ground.

    River had remedial trimming to compensate for her pasterns and cannon bones being deviated for about a year, but I was warned that she may need corrective shoeing by the time she was being backed. Fortunately over time the deviation seems to have corrected itself, but I was very pleased my farrier spotted it before it was too late to do something about it.
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  7. #17
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    Moons toe was very long at 6 months so he needed doing, there was no way I could let him go any longer.

    Star has the farrier purely for the motions. Just to get use to the trimmers, rasp and a strange person picking her feet up. She's been a super star today for her first little trim.

    I'm having the dentist out soon too but all he'll do is stroke her head and feel inside her mouth. No rasping or gag, purely just so she gets use to someone else being around her head and in her mouth. The dentist has offered to do that for free because he's coming out to do Berry and its good practise for Star

  8. #18
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    Default Re: youngsters, how old to start hoof trimming?

    I was picking my colts feet up from very young then I'd say from 4-5 months I'd get the farrier to pick them up when he came to do my others just get him used to new people lifting his feet.

    He had his first trim at about 10 months old. He's 18 months now and has had them done 3 times he's good as gold.. then again he's about as laid back as you can get with pretty much everything!

    Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk 2

  9. #19

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    I pick foals feet up from a few weeks old and get them used to being handled etc. the farrier has a play with them when he trims mum, and I leave it up to his professional judgement as to when they need trimming - occasionally he might just run the rasp around them every couple of months for the first year, depending on the foal/breeding/field conditions (eg wet paddocks not going to wear hooves down naturally!) I don't think there are set times etc, every baby is different, and weather/land type will play some part in it as will breeding etc I'm sure.

  10. #20

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    Scouts had his done twice since he was a yearling however his backs grow stupidly fast!

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