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Thread: Opinions/advice/help.....

  1. #1
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    Default Opinions/advice/help.....

    I've had J 5 weeks now, he turned 4 in April and the girl who owned him before me bought him and backed him as a 3 year old. She then hunted, dressaged and show jumped him to some degree through the winter.

    I went to view him, road in the school, took him out on the road alone and in company, foot perfect.

    Got him home and he settled in well both to the stable, me and the other horses.

    Once I had tack sorted for him I rode him out down the bridleway, again foot perfect, the next time I rode (4 days later) he bolted with me, hard to pin point why, strange riding area, lots of things to spoke at, me fiddling with stirrup leathers, new saddle to name a few.

    So due to my busted leg and our holiday he had about 4 weeks off from ridden work, I've carried on walking out in hand, lunging and long reining happily at least every 3rd day if not every other day.

    Friday I got back on him with mum on the end of the lunge line, he was ok, a bit on his toes when we went back in the area where he bolted but before that I rode him where I usually lunge and he was fine.

    Today saddle fitter came, i got on him again, no sooner had I got both feet in the stirrups he bronced and I hit the deck for the 2nd time in 3 mounts!!

    i know things are unpredictable with a youngster but now I'm wondering where to go next..... My gut is telling me to carry on with the in hand work slowly and turn him away from ridden work until next year and give him chance to mature, let his forehand catch his quarters up and let him be a "horse" for a while. Reback him in march/April time next year as a 5 year old - the last thing I want is to keep getting on and getting thrown off and ending up with a horse I can do nothing with through my confidence being shot.

    What would you do?

  2. #2
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    My gut is telling me to carry on with the in hand work slowly and turn him away from ridden work until next year and give him chance to mature, let his forehand catch his quarters up and let him be a "horse" for a while. Reback him in march/April time next year as a 5 year old - the last thing I want is to keep getting on and getting thrown off and ending up with a horse I can do nothing with through my confidence being shot.
    I think I'd do what you've already thought of. I know there are some who advocate cracking on with things, especially after a fall, but he's only young and you've not had him long. I know from moving my own horses around it can sometimes take them months to settle in at a new yard, even with me as a "constant". So it could simply be that he's still unsettled and not quite sure of himself.
    It sounds like you've considered the physical side of things so my only thought there is when were his teeth last seen to? Is his bit a good fit and not pinching anything or catching on his teeth?

    If physically everything is fine, I think I would spend the summer doing ground work, helping him build a bond with you and play it by ear from there. It may be that in a couple of weeks, he suddenly settles and everything is fine, or he may find having a few months off over autumn/winter beneficial to give his mind a chance to mature. It sounds like he's done quite a bit for a youngster and he might just need a bit of time to let off some steam before settling into work properly.
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  3. #3
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    IMO you need to crack it now, whilst it's fresh.

    Has his back been checked? Second opinion on saddle?

    Once you're sure you're happy with the above, Perhaps get an instructor or something to come see him/you work. Lunge the **** off him before you ride next time too.

    I'd get him going, get him ticking over and then come winter give him some time out

    You can do just groundwork till the cows come home with some but it doesn't always transfer to ridden work in my experience of babies.
    Native pony addict!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by diamondgem View Post
    I've had J 5 weeks now, he turned 4 in April and the girl who owned him before me bought him and backed him as a 3 year old. She then hunted, dressaged and show jumped him to some degree through the winter.
    Sounds like he had quite a lot done with him before he turned 4 (I didn't know people went in for hunting 3 year olds ). With that in mind, I would go with your gut and give him time to grow up a bit and mature. Nothing wrong with turning him out and letting him be a baby for a while

  5. #5
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    Thanks everyone.

    He's having his teeth done next week, the vetting identified a wolf tooth so I'll have that pulled now.

    I'll book him in for his back checked and I'm tempted to have his bloods tested from the vetting to cover all bases.

    With regards to saddles I haven't found one yet that I've been able to ride him in properly (apart from the one I viewed him with but she wasn't selling his tack and has changed shape since then) the saddle fitter was here yesterday doing her first visit/fit so I'm kind of at a loss for riding until I get him fitted at the moment.

    I think I'll press on with bloods, teeth and back and go from there in a couple of weeks.

  6. #6
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    I think press on with checking him over, he sounds like he has done a lot a young age and he could now be feeling the strain from it.

    If and when that's checked if something comes up then obviously sort it then perhaps slowly try again.

    If nothing is found to be wrong or likely to have caused it, I would be inclined to go with your gut and give him some chill out time, it could also be his brain is slowly catching up with everything that has been done with him too and now he is saying no I need to be a baby.

    If something is found you sort it and he comes back into work and is ok, keep him ticking over for the summer, don't ask a great deal of him at all then give him the winter to chill and bring him back next year.

    If something is found, you sort it and he doesn't agree with coming into work, then opt straight for turning away now because that says to me again his brain just isn't happy with everything that has been done with him and perhaps start him again in a few months time.

    There's no reason whilst he is turned away you can still take him for inhand walks etc to introduce him to things around him.

    Some horses take a while to settle into their surroundings. Some take a while to trust new owners. Tegan when she first came was very worried about new people, her eyes used to show it. Now she has been here 9 months and knows me etc she trusts me to not let anyone hurt her and she's happy enough to let people approach her when I am around.

  7. #7
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    A quick update, i've done a bit of searching on the net this morning about J and found that he was actually sold at York sales in Sept 2012, which would mean the girl i bought him off only had him a matter of 7 months (not 14 as she told me) and in fact did not break him/back him herself...... Her reason for selling him was genuine enough, pregnant and 3 other horses, didn't want a youngster going to waste.......

    So in the space of 7 months he's potentially had 3 different homes!! He is a lovely boy and a pleasure to be around, i don't feel scared of him in anyway and i don't believe the last couple of incidents have been malicious, i think there is more to it.....i'm going to check his passport when i get home and see if his breeder was the one who sold him at the sales.

  8. #8
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    You've only had him a matter of weeks and he is still a baby - I would give him a bit more chance to settle in and understand that this is now his home.

    Once he has settled though then I would crack on with him - even if only to get to the point where you can walk/trot round a paddock - then I would consider turning him away for a couple of months because I do think he's done a fair bit already for a baby.

    The other thing to take into consideration is that he could well be going through the kevin's which won't be helping the situation at all.

  9. #9
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    The only time Harry has bucked was when he saddle was uncomfortable so as you have said you are struggling getting a saddle I would firstly think about that.

    Get a saddle that fits him and go from there but he is still a baby so don't expect too much

  10. #10
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    I broke in my pony, who was fine for about 6 rides and then started broncing ... so im just going to say what worked for me

    Obviously you know all the things that you need to get checked ect and all the areas to check not in pain. If thats ok then I would get a rider (mine was a paid hunts jockey) who is not going to fall off ... and get them to have a few sessions just riding your horse, my pony just needed to learn that bucking was not ok, and it does not dismount the rider.

    once he learnt that he hasn't done it again since (since December) ....

    and also having a second opinion may be helpfull, if said professional who rides lots of different horses says that they think the horse is just being a *** that would help ease my worrys ... but if the said professional says that when he bolts / bucks .. it feels more serious like fear / pain you can investigate this further

    hope that helps
    For sale - Endurance irons - 17.5 treeless saddle used once with pad and stirrups, and hunters martingale full / xfull pm for details

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