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Thread: Smokey Waters

  1. #1

    Default Smokey Waters

    I've wanted to try this for years and thanks to uni I finally understand apertures and shutter speeds enough to make it work!







  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Petersfield, Hants
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    3,768

    Default

    Wow!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Northamptonshire/oxfordshire border
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    4,715

    Default

    Wow!!!

    Sent from my LT30p using Tapatalk
    [URL="http://s86.photobucket.com/user/kissmesweet69/media/Kris%201_zps27izfsmy.png.html"][IMG]http://i86.photobucket.com/albums/k105/kissmesweet69/Kris%201_zps27izfsmy.png[/IMG][/URL]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    London
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    466

    Default

    Very good. Aperture and shutter speed were used with film cameras too.
    With digital you need to understand ISO as well. That is what I was told last summer.
    In film cameras the films came with different speeds. But a high sensitive film one would use in winter had coarser grain, so the detail wasnt so good.
    To change your film speed on a film camera you had ro take out a half used film and replace it with a different speed film.
    On a digital camera you have the same choice of sensitivity to light, but you alter it by changing the ISO.
    I was taught to raise the ISO when I wanted to take a tourist pic in a church where the light was poor and no flash was allowed.
    So how is it important when riding?
    By increasing the sensitivity you cut the time needed. So if you are taking a rider in canter (or any action sports shot) and you aim for an exposure not greater than 1000th second, you can adjust the ISO so as to get that fast pic even in winter weather.
    I learned this bit from Scott Kelby Photography course, book 1 or 2 - probably Book 1. And took great pics of grand daughter's riding lesson.
    You can also use repeat shots. Another Mum showed me that watching girls football. Setting repeat shots and then cropping catches just the right moment with moving figures. With horses you need a little care as the repeat clicking is quite loud on my camera.
    My own next problem is to study how to take nice pics of my grey (white) mare.
    I think Kelby's guidance on taking brides in white dresses may come in useful here to get the detail of her coat.

  5. #5

    Default

    I recommend the Zone System for taking pictures of white (or black) subjects, it takes a while to get the grasp of it but it's really handy for getting the correct exposures so that your whites and blacks have the right amount of detail

  6. #6

    Default

    Funky!!

    R.I.P Mickey - 1996 - 31st May 2012

  7. #7

    Default

    That's awesome!
    THE EQUINE INFORMATION EXCHANGE Equine information, not speculation.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    London
    Posts
    466

    Default

    What is the zone system?

    P.S. The signature link is not working for me - I get a google error message it cant be found?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Manchester/Nottingham
    Posts
    932

    Default

    They're so good!

    They make the photos I've taken for uni look rubbish. Though I am only 1 week in to the module so don't really know anything yet

  10. #10

    Default

    Lovely !!

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