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Thread: Rowdy Youngster

  1. #1

    Default Rowdy Youngster

    When I first got Scout he had just turned one and had just been gelded, they hadn't handled him much at all so he was very excitable, he liked to chase me, kick at me, jump onto my back etc He suddenly stopped doing it but since then he has always been nippy, the more you tell him off the more he thinks you're playing with him and just gets more and more excited.
    Recently he's started it again, he grabs things off you like head collars, fly masks etc. and if you're walking up the field he holds on to your back or bites you, the other day he grabbed my jacket so I turned round to shout at him and was greeted by his back hooves inches away from my face. Basically he is being a little toad I've been working him more, doing different things and he is really really good when he's doing something but as soon as he's back in the field he turns into a pain in the ****! Cleo's turned against him and doesn't like him near her, Della is the friendliest horse I've ever met and loves any horse she meets but even she's turning against him, she tolerates him now but gives him the odd kick when he bites her bum (don't blame her!)


    I know he's just moved yards so could be settling but he wasn't like this when we moved yards before, I don't know whether it's a hormonal thing or if he's just messing about.

  2. #2

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    It sounds to me as if he's getting a bit arrogant and full of himself; he's testing the boundaries to see what he can and can't get away with. However, not only is his behaviour completely unacceptable, it's pretty dangerous too.

    It seem as if it's got to the point where you really need to tell him 'No' because he's going to end up hurting you.

    For one, you should never let him be that close to you in the field if he has those sort of habits; as soon as you step into the field you need to enforce your space and not let him harass you. I know he's your horse and you probably want to pet him but if he's coming over to you with the intention of being a nuisance then you need to be assertive and keep him at a distance until he learns to be nice and respectful. I would take a lunging/schooling whip in with you because if he manages to bite or strike out, playfully or not, you need to be able to teach him that it isn't a game and you absolutely will not tolerate that sort of behaviour.

    Secondly, in and between, can you do some sort of groundwork with him in his actual field? Leading, backing up, standing, etc.? It's like he thinks that the field is his place and he's in charge of it so he'd probably benefit from a bit of work in there to quieten him down a bit.

  3. #3

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    I suppose it is partially my fault as I'm reluctant to tell him off as he tends to respond with another bite or kick!
    The other day he managed to actually kick me and I shouted at him like I'd never done before and chased him off He tried to come back over and shouted him to get away and he stopped and watched me walk out the field. That's the first time he's actually responded to being told off though

    I'll take a whip in today and try some groundwork in the field, I have to say that when he was a year old Stephiibean came and did a groundwork session with him in the field which really quietened him down.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by WonderBolt View Post
    I suppose it is partially my fault as I'm reluctant to tell him off as he tends to respond with another bite or kick!
    The other day he managed to actually kick me and I shouted at him like I'd never done before and chased him off He tried to come back over and shouted him to get away and he stopped and watched me walk out the field. That's the first time he's actually responded to being told off though

    I'll take a whip in today and try some groundwork in the field, I have to say that when he was a year old Stephiibean came and did a groundwork session with him in the field which really quietened him down.
    I think the key is, at this point, to not let him anywhere near you in the field so that he doesn't have a chance to bite/kick. You can use the whip so that if he does try to launch or charge at you, you can retaliate with it; you probably only need to do it once before a wave of it and a growl will be enough to keep him at bay.

    Once he's quietened down and understands the concept that it isn't a fun game, you can start inviting him in for a pat and a scratch but still making sure there is no nipping and that he isn't pushing you around.

    They all try it on when they're younger, you just have to be quick to enforce the rules so that they don't grow up thinking that it's okay to bully humans!

  5. #5
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    The less you tell him off the more he thinks that behaiour is allowed and he will become dominating over you. I know its a different issue however the same dominating behaviour is now being shown ny two of your horses. Time to nip it in the bud hun.

    Short crop, tap on chest when he gets too close and back him up, the same as with dells

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