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Thread: Grumpy weanling. Any ideas?

  1. #1

    Default Grumpy weanling. Any ideas?

    I have a 7 month old filly foal who ive now had for just over a week. She was weaned the day i collected her, transported 5 hrs to her new home and was never haltered or handled. She is friendly and will let me touch and brush her neck, back and rump. She hates me touching her legs, chest and belly. I get grumpy faces, ears flat back, she has bitten me twice and threatens to bite a lot, she has also swung her quarters at me as well. Her feet are in need of attention so i have been working on lifting them and holding them. I can lift all four feet but not without her being a grumpy sod.

    She is now haltered and leading and will stand tied up happily enough. my gut instinct is to turn her out with Lady to learn some manners but i dont want her getting hurt either. I have just been pushing her out of my space and making loud noises when she tries to bite or kick. Ang other ideas?

  2. #2
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    Honestly, I'd pop her out for a little while. She may simply be a bit overwhelmed still, looking for her mother and a bit uncertain. Some time out with Lady to show her the ropes will probably go a long way to helping her settle in. River and Stormy both went out as weanlings (River with a herd of six others; Stormy just with River for a couple of months, at my YM's request, then integrated into the herd) and the older horses immediately recognised them as babies and treated them as such. Any injuries (all minor) were because of sticking their heads (or legs) in the most ridiculous of places, or trying to buck AND canter and taking a tumble. As Stormy has gotten older, I've seen one or two of the others threaten to bite when she oversteps her boundaries but they have never yet made contact with her, and she still mouths at them when she knows she's in trouble as if to say "hey, I'm just a baby!" which usually gets her out of it.

    And, just as an aside (unless I have missed a post)
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  3. #3
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    If turn her out to learn some manners. She will get put in her place but I dontbhhijkban older horse will tober her to any major extent.

    Listen, smile, agree and then do whatever the hell you were going to do anyway.

  4. #4
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    Put her out with Lady She will soon learn some manners plus I think that youngsters learn more that we give them credit for just from watching how other horses are with humans.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by madlady View Post
    Put her out with Lady She will soon learn some manners plus I think that youngsters learn more that we give them credit for just from watching how other horses are with humans.
    I agree. The first time Stormy had her feet trimmed, she was absolutely fascinated watching the farrier do River's. After he'd worked on Stormy's first hoof, she started offering the others in the order that I pick them out, so it definitely seemed like she'd watched him work on River and figured out what it was all about.
    [CENTER][IMG]http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y228/Gothic_Sez/Signatures/Signature01.png[/IMG]
    [FONT="Book Antiqua"][COLOR="Sienna"]He's of the colour of the nutmeg. And of the heat of the ginger...he is pure air and fire; and the dull elements of earth and water never appear in him
    *Salsa* 19th April 1998 - 7th July 2013[/COLOR][/FONT]
    Forever Loved and Never Forgotten

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  6. #6

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    Leaving them out isnt an option sadly with flooded fields. Lady is a grump herself and cant tolerate babies. She hated Odie and tried kicking at him and bit him all the time. It didnt put him off though, he adored her for whatever reason. Though with Aria being a Filly, lady seems to hate her even more. she is lunging at her over the stable door when i walk Aria past and im afraid she will hurt her if i put them out into the atena together although i do think, if lady can stop herself from hurting Aria it would be the best thing for her.

    Stuck between a rock and a hard place.

  7. #7
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    Could you borrow a horse for the winter for her to go out with? A friendly pony or an older retired horse?
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  8. #8

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    I have no where to turn them out. There is another 2 year old at the yard that she has been in the arena with but she bosses even her around. I think turning her out will leave her more feral anyway. She needs to be used to being stabled during the winter. She gets out for a few hours in the arena every day to play with her 2 year old buddy. Although thats not helping with the bossyness. She needs knocked down a peg or two. Lol

  9. #9
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    Youngsters need turnout with other horses to just be horses. I wouldn't have a youngster if it couldn't be turned out daily in a herd environment or with an older horse or two to show it the rules. If this couldn't be provided where I was stabled and I couldn't find affordable and suitable accomodation elsewhere I would have to consider the prudence in having such a young horse.

    Youngster need to be disciplined by other horses. They need to learn to be horses before we start teaching them things. I've seen ponies come off the hills and not be feral never mind horses bred and seeing humans on yards everyday.

    Listen, smile, agree and then do whatever the hell you were going to do anyway.

  10. #10
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    TBH I've been in situations where we haven't had 24/7 winter turnout (I still don't!) and youngsters have had to cope, over recent years though it's not been so much of an issue as our youngsters have been home bred so have been well handled and mannerly even before weaning.

    Sounds like she isn't seeing you as boss at the moment so needs to have some reminders! Some years ago now a friend went and bought a Sec D filly straight off the field - she was weaned by being put in our trailer and she was pretty feral, again there was no 24/7 turnout for her and we did have some battles the first 6 months - and yes she did get some slaps and growls and we got some nips and kicks.

    I would say work on getting her to see you as being in charge - I've found rope halters and long ropes to be an absolute godsend because I use the rope and body language to move the horse while being able to keep out of the danger zone - could you possibly try something like that? Also giving her a smack won't kill her - I'm not an advocate of beating horses up or anything, but, if she can't learn her manners from another horse she'll have to learn them from you and you giving her a slap on the shoulder or a crack around the bum isn't going to do her any damage and (IMO) is nothing compared to what another horse would do.

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