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Thread: Getting a youngster - what to expect?!

  1. #11

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    Personally I think castration really depends on each individual horse, and what you want from them. Ordinarily I would geld as a yearling (no earlier) as the sooner it is done, the quicker the recovery. I do not like castration at 6 months, like many studs seem to do.

    If I intend to show a horse later in life, I may put off castration until 2yo - this just allows them to develop a bigger frame IMO. This does completely depend on the horse's attitude though; one becoming colty will get cut, regardless of age - once they become colty, castration will not necessarily stop this. I used to work with a racehorse that was castrated as a 2yo and you would not have known he was gelded! He would mount mares (or people) and was very handy with his teeth (definitely not a rig!)! I've also handled working stallions that you would think are geldings, they are so laid back, so it really depends on the individual.

    Not sure of your circumstances, but livery yards are few and far between that take colts, and even those that are happy to take them initially can soon change their mind when/if they become a nuisance to others.

    Personally I'd have most cut as yearlings, and only those that I intend to show (hunters/cobs) that I want to build up thicker necks etc left until 2yo or 3yo.

  2. #12

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    I would love to consider showing him if my confidence will let me. I never showed Bailey because I didn't think she'd be anyone's cup of tea and I was too worried I wouldn't do her any justice. She's just a happy lass who does as little as she can get off with!
    I'm looking to build my experience with him but he will be gelded as I have no desire to breed and the last thing I would want is a accidentally pregnant Bailey.
    The yard I'm on is the Thors breeder so she's said she will happily let him stay a colt and accommodate him - he's the last colt of her late stallion so she has a little bit of a soft spot.
    I was wondering about feeding too as my mate is a true good doer and she doesn't get fed and she's on restricted grazing because she can look at a field full of good grass and explode! With youngsters how is best to monitor their weight or is this not really an issue till they are older?


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  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miss_Bailey View Post
    I would love to consider showing him if my confidence will let me. I never showed Bailey because I didn't think she'd be anyone's cup of tea and I was too worried I wouldn't do her any justice. She's just a happy lass who does as little as she can get off with!
    I'm looking to build my experience with him but he will be gelded as I have no desire to breed and the last thing I would want is a accidentally pregnant Bailey.
    The yard I'm on is the Thors breeder so she's said she will happily let him stay a colt and accommodate him - he's the last colt of her late stallion so she has a little bit of a soft spot.
    I was wondering about feeding too as my mate is a true good doer and she doesn't get fed and she's on restricted grazing because she can look at a field full of good grass and explode! With youngsters how is best to monitor their weight or is this not really an issue till they are older?


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    You don't want to let a youngster get fat, all of mine as very little babies have been given stud balancer for vits and mins at the required amount and a chaff as and when it was necessary, but you also don't want a thin youngster, enough of a covering to let them grow and do what they need to do imo. I have always gelded 2 y.o and no earlier (though one of my shetland yearlings may get gelded sooner then I ever have) but I do like my showing and like them to have a good build on them as Evinstar says. Evinstar has said it all, patience and understanding, and when trying to get them used to anything just act like its normal and don't get too stressed or worried about it, they pick up when you worry.
    George was rugged as a baby, the reason being he was weaned in January 2014 and we moved him to the yard I was on at the time to the field that I had Ted and Angus in, this meant that he had NO shelter whatsoever so I made up for it by putting a 100g on him through the really nasty spells but up here it was bad enough to justify it even Angus dropped weight that winter!!

    I think where you are keeping them if you can leave a little longer if won't be too much of a problem and his breeder will likely have a decent field to put them into with some of the younger horses for company as well which would be lovely for him. I would loved to have put George with other youngsters but sadly I only had old Angus and Ted at the time and other horses weren't an option at that livery due to the way they were kept!

    Their beauty captures every eye, a gift from God for all mankind, they lend us wings so we may fly, to ride a horse is to ride the sky

    Touchstone Floinn - Purebred graded ID stallion available for stud.

    Rest In Peace Minstrel. 08.03.1998 - 31.01.2013 I will love you forever my own black beauty.
    Rest in Peace Stranduff Nichol 08.05.2014 - 19.11.2015 Goodnight little man.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Minstrel View Post
    You don't want to let a youngster get fat, all of mine as very little babies have been given stud balancer for vits and mins at the required amount and a chaff as and when it was necessary, but you also don't want a thin youngster, enough of a covering to let them grow and do what they need to do imo. I have always gelded 2 y.o and no earlier (though one of my shetland yearlings may get gelded sooner then I ever have) but I do like my showing and like them to have a good build on them as Evinstar says. Evinstar has said it all, patience and understanding, and when trying to get them used to anything just act like its normal and don't get too stressed or worried about it, they pick up when you worry.
    George was rugged as a baby, the reason being he was weaned in January 2014 and we moved him to the yard I was on at the time to the field that I had Ted and Angus in, this meant that he had NO shelter whatsoever so I made up for it by putting a 100g on him through the really nasty spells but up here it was bad enough to justify it even Angus dropped weight that winter!!

    I think where you are keeping them if you can leave a little longer if won't be too much of a problem and his breeder will likely have a decent field to put them into with some of the younger horses for company as well which would be lovely for him. I would loved to have put George with other youngsters but sadly I only had old Angus and Ted at the time and other horses weren't an option at that livery due to the way they were kept!
    Yeah I'm hoping that where he is and the other youngsters he'll be in with he'll be fine Bailey doesn't get rugged unless it absolutely dire outside (but she has the body weight to keep her cosy and does have one hell of a thick coat when it comes through) that I'll just use the judgement I've used with her in the past for rugging.
    Feeding will probably be the oddest thing since Thor will be a completely different set up from Bailey and it will be a BIG learning curve for me to cater to something so different and hopefully get it right. I always worry I'll do something wrong and the wee guy will end up not liking me as daft as it sounds.
    Can anyone suggest the things to have ready for him?


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  5. #15

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    Don't stress too much about him liking your or not... In my experience you can be the best owner in the world, and still not click with a horse. I bred a lovely colt some years ago, who I always intended to keep and have as a forever horse. However, by the age of 4 I realised it was just not right - nothing particularly terrible, but we just did not gel. I sold him to a lovely home, and bought Charles as a 3yo, who is my soulmate. Instantly he had me wrapped around his hoof, and he is just the best friend I could ever want. I rarely buy a horse that 'old' but it just seemed right.

    Showing should be fun and do not put too much pressure on yourself. When I started showing there were few/no local youngstock classes, so my first EVER showing class was at the South of England county show! Talk about thrown in at the deep end!! There are loads of people on this forum that can help you with turnout/training advice if/when you decide to show.

    As for things to have ready; a headcollar (I always prefer leather for youngsters) and leadrope is really all you need. I do tend to use gloves when leading youngsters, just in case.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    6,281

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miss_Bailey View Post
    Yeah I'm hoping that where he is and the other youngsters he'll be in with he'll be fine Bailey doesn't get rugged unless it absolutely dire outside (but she has the body weight to keep her cosy and does have one hell of a thick coat when it comes through) that I'll just use the judgement I've used with her in the past for rugging.
    Feeding will probably be the oddest thing since Thor will be a completely different set up from Bailey and it will be a BIG learning curve for me to cater to something so different and hopefully get it right. I always worry I'll do something wrong and the wee guy will end up not liking me as daft as it sounds.
    Can anyone suggest the things to have ready for him?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Headcollar and leadrope is all you really need. I always prefer leather headcollars, especially for youngsters!

    Their beauty captures every eye, a gift from God for all mankind, they lend us wings so we may fly, to ride a horse is to ride the sky

    Touchstone Floinn - Purebred graded ID stallion available for stud.

    Rest In Peace Minstrel. 08.03.1998 - 31.01.2013 I will love you forever my own black beauty.
    Rest in Peace Stranduff Nichol 08.05.2014 - 19.11.2015 Goodnight little man.

  7. #17

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    Well that's a nice easy shopping list!


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  8. #18

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    Oh another thing I have found is that you can have a youngster that behaves perfectly once backed and into their 4th year but sometimes as a 5 year old they suddenly develop 'an opinion'. No always but when you have an angel that overnight turns into a devil it's a bit of a shock...

  9. #19

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    I'm mentally preparing for that. I think it will be rewarding in the end but getting there will be a journey and a half!
    I keep reminding myself that he will be completely different to Bailey and even though she has her moments she's old enough now that they don't last very long and she knows what's expected from her.


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  10. #20

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    Oh you will love it! Those moments where something clicks will make your heart swell and you will forget all the bad stuff

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