Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: What sort of trap for a first time driver

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Everywhere
    Posts
    127

    Default What sort of trap for a first time driver

    Just wondering what kind of cart you would put on a first time driving horse -14hh cob. Also do you have any pics you could post.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Cheshire
    Posts
    1,772

    Default

    A two wheeler of correct size and balance for the horse, in a four wheeler they can jacknife easier and so is not ideal for a first carriage

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/STEEL-FEI-DRIV...item414aee990c

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Horse-Pony-Tra...item45ef76b6ba

    I like something like the above if you can

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Rotherham
    Posts
    4,482

    Default

    I love my Robinsons cart, the first and only one I have for Smartie. Tommy has a very similar one. Both enjoy their work and are have taken to driving like ducks to water

    A lot have people have issues with Robinsons carts but for me it was the step on the ladder which I couldn't have otherwise taken. Likewise with my harness from ebay! As long as things are looked after, there is no reason why they shouldn't be just as safe and long-lasting as anything more expensive.

    Hopefully Conway will have something a little more upmarket but then we want to do private driving classes, rather than exercise classes.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    373

    Default

    yaaay, I love my robinsosn shetland cart. Brilliant value for money. And likewise the harness from ebay, although at shetland size it would have fitted a 14.2 cob lol. A few adjustments were needed.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    5,274

    Default

    There have been one or two horror stories with the Robinsons carts, keep a close eye on them maintenence wise. The shafts have been known to snap.

    We have a Bennington, that we use for the bigger guys, and a crowland 2/4 wheel versatile that you can swap about from 2 to 4 wheels.
    As Bramblesmum says a 2 wheeler for safety for a novice horse/driver.

    A really experienced driver might get away with a 4 wheeler, the Dutch and Germans do, but I like to have belt and braces and stick with a 2 wheeler in case everything turns to manure.

    This is Piggy put to with the cart for the first time, I have not done up the reaces here, as if he panics I can get him out fast, But I would only do this in an encolsed envoronment, not a 50 acre field.


    Then once I was happy that he was happy, I do everything up and get in.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    373

    Default

    Thanks for the advice Wally.Will keep an eye on that. Been okay so far, and my shetland loves it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    hampshire
    Posts
    23

    Default

    thats a bummer about the robinsons cart as i had plans to drive with my shetland foal and had my eyes on one of those........mmmm,maybe not then.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    staffordshire
    Posts
    6

    Default

    my carts a robinsons, would love a hillams for my shetland but the price is out of my range !

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    5,274

    Default

    So long as you keep an eye on all the welds and don't go hammering a Robinson's over rough ground they ought to be okay. I have heard both good and bad about the, obviously the bad floats to the top and you heard more of the bad thing.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •